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Perspective

The Quality Improvement Challenge—How Nurses and Allied Health Professionals Can Solve the Knowing–Doing Gap in Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS)

1
Orthopaedic Research Institute, Bournemouth University, 6th Floor, Executive Business Centre, 89 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth BH8 8EB, UK
2
Physiotherapy Department, University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth BH7 7DW, UK
Medicina 2020, 56(12), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56120652
Received: 27 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
The English National Health Service (NHS), and all health services around the world, will continue to face economic and capacity challenges. Quality improvement (QI) interventions, such as Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS), that are proven to improve patient care and deliver operational benefits are therefore needed. However, widespread implementation remains a challenge. Implementation of ERAS within the NHS over the last 10 years is reviewed, with a focus on total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Difficulties with implementation are highlighted, and a recommendation for the future is presented. This perspective is novel in the ERAS literature, and centres around increasing the understanding of perioperative care teams on the need for utilising a recognised QI method (e.g., plan–do–study–act cycles, Lean, and Six Sigma) to implement ERAS protocols (which are a QI intervention) successfully. The importance of differentiating between a QI method and a QI intervention has value across all other ERAS surgical procedures. View Full-Text
Keywords: enhanced recovery after surgery; quality improvement; surgery; orthopaedics enhanced recovery after surgery; quality improvement; surgery; orthopaedics
MDPI and ACS Style

Wainwright, T.W. The Quality Improvement Challenge—How Nurses and Allied Health Professionals Can Solve the Knowing–Doing Gap in Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS). Medicina 2020, 56, 652. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56120652

AMA Style

Wainwright TW. The Quality Improvement Challenge—How Nurses and Allied Health Professionals Can Solve the Knowing–Doing Gap in Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS). Medicina. 2020; 56(12):652. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56120652

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wainwright, Thomas W. 2020. "The Quality Improvement Challenge—How Nurses and Allied Health Professionals Can Solve the Knowing–Doing Gap in Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS)" Medicina 56, no. 12: 652. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56120652

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