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Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging

The Centre for Signal Processing in Neuroimaging and Systems Neuroscience (SPINSN), Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TP, UK
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Sensors 2008, 8(12), 7649-7670; https://doi.org/10.3390/s8127649
Received: 1 July 2008 / Revised: 30 October 2008 / Accepted: 26 November 2008 / Published: 2 December 2008
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Sensors and Techniques for Neurochemical Monitoring)
The changes in blood flow, blood volume and oxygenation that accompany focal increases in neural activity are collectively referred to as the hemodynamic response and form the basis of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. A principle factor influencing blood oxygenation, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption is poorly understood and as such, data from imaging techniques are difficult to interpret in terms of the underlying neural activity. In particular how neurometabolic changes vary temporally, spatially and in magnitude remains uncertain. Furthermore knowledge of which aspects of neural activity are closely reflected by metabolic changes is essential for the correct interpretation of cognitive neuroscience studies in terms of information processing. Polarographic electrode measurements of cerebral tissue oxygenation in animal models following presentation of sensory stimuli have started to address these issues. Early studies demonstrated both increases and decreases in tissue oxygenation following neural activation. However a recent series of elegant studies in the cat visual system demonstrated a tight spatial and temporal coupling between evoked peri-synaptic activity and oxygen consumption following presentation of visual stimuli. View Full-Text
Keywords: Polarographic oxygen electrode; brain tissue; neuroimaging Polarographic oxygen electrode; brain tissue; neuroimaging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bartlett, K.; Saka, M.; Jones, M. Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging. Sensors 2008, 8, 7649-7670. https://doi.org/10.3390/s8127649

AMA Style

Bartlett K, Saka M, Jones M. Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging. Sensors. 2008; 8(12):7649-7670. https://doi.org/10.3390/s8127649

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bartlett, Kate, Mohamad Saka, and Myles Jones. 2008. "Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging" Sensors 8, no. 12: 7649-7670. https://doi.org/10.3390/s8127649

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