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Article

The Design and Simulation of a 16-Sensors Plantar Pressure Insole Layout for Different Applications: From Sports to Clinics, a Pilot Study

1
Department of Information Engineering, DEI, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
2
Department of Medicine, DIMED, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Mehmet Rasit Yuce
Sensors 2021, 21(4), 1450; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041450
Received: 14 January 2021 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 16 February 2021 / Published: 19 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors: 20th Anniversary)
The quantification of plantar pressure distribution is widely done in the diagnosis of lower limbs deformities, gait analysis, footwear design, and sport applications. To date, a number of pressure insole layouts have been proposed, with different configurations according to their applications. The goal of this study is to assess the validity of a 16-sensors (1.5 × 1.5 cm) pressure insole to detect plantar pressure distribution during different tasks in the clinic and sport domains. The data of 39 healthy adults, acquired with a Pedar-X® system (Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany) during walking, weight lifting, and drop landing, were used to simulate the insole. The sensors were distributed by considering the location of the peak pressure on all trials: 4 on the hindfoot, 3 on the midfoot, and 9 on the forefoot. The following variables were computed with both systems and compared by estimating the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE): Peak/Mean Pressure, Ground Reaction Force (GRF), Center of Pressure (COP), the distance between COP and the origin, the Contact Area. The lowest (0.61%) and highest (82.4%) RMSE values were detected during gait on the medial-lateral COP and the GRF, respectively. This approach could be used for testing different layouts on various applications prior to production. View Full-Text
Keywords: plantar pressure insoles; layout; gait analysis; drop landing; weight lifting plantar pressure insoles; layout; gait analysis; drop landing; weight lifting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ciniglio, A.; Guiotto, A.; Spolaor, F.; Sawacha, Z. The Design and Simulation of a 16-Sensors Plantar Pressure Insole Layout for Different Applications: From Sports to Clinics, a Pilot Study. Sensors 2021, 21, 1450. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041450

AMA Style

Ciniglio A, Guiotto A, Spolaor F, Sawacha Z. The Design and Simulation of a 16-Sensors Plantar Pressure Insole Layout for Different Applications: From Sports to Clinics, a Pilot Study. Sensors. 2021; 21(4):1450. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041450

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ciniglio, Alfredo; Guiotto, Annamaria; Spolaor, Fabiola; Sawacha, Zimi. 2021. "The Design and Simulation of a 16-Sensors Plantar Pressure Insole Layout for Different Applications: From Sports to Clinics, a Pilot Study" Sensors 21, no. 4: 1450. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041450

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