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Article

A Pilot Study to Validate a Wearable Inertial Sensor for Gait Assessment in Older Adults with Falls

1
Centre for Automation and Robotics, UPM-CSIC, 28500 Madrid, Spain
2
Department of Geriatrics, Foundation for Research and Biomedical Innovation of the Infanta Sofía University Hospital and Henares University Hospital, (FIIB HUIS HHEN), European University, 28702 Madrid, Spain
3
Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine Department, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28922 Madrid, Spain
4
School of Experimental Sciences and Technology, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28933 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Rey Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Susanna Spinsante
Sensors 2021, 21(13), 4334; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21134334
Received: 11 May 2021 / Revised: 19 June 2021 / Accepted: 22 June 2021 / Published: 24 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systems, Applications and Services for Smart Cities)
The high prevalence of falls and the enormous impact they have on the elderly population is a cause for concern. We aimed to develop a walking-monitor gait pattern (G-STRIDE) for older adults based on a 6-axis inertial measurement (IMU) with the application of pedestrian dead reckoning algorithms and tested its structural and clinical validity. A cross-sectional case–control study was conducted with 21 participants (11 fallers and 10 non-fallers). We measured gait using an IMU attached to the foot while participants walked around different grounds (indoor flooring, outdoor floor, asphalt, etc.). The G-STRIDE consisted of a portable inertial device that monitored the gait pattern and a mobile app for telematic clinical analysis. G-STRIDE made it possible to measure gait parameters under normal living conditions when walking without assessing the patient in the outpatient clinic. Moreover, we verified concurrent validity with convectional outcome measures using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and analyzed the differences between participants. G-STRIDE showed high estimation accuracy for the walking speed of the elderly and good concurrent validity compared to conventional measures (ICC = 0.69; p < 0.000). In conclusion, the developed inertial-based G-STRIDE can accurately classify older people with risk to fall with a significance as high as using traditional but more subjective clinical methods (gait speed, Timed Up and Go Test). View Full-Text
Keywords: frailty; gait analysis; IMU; mobile app; telemedicine; pedestrian dead reckoning; assistant frailty; gait analysis; IMU; mobile app; telemedicine; pedestrian dead reckoning; assistant
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MDPI and ACS Style

García-Villamil, G.; Neira-Álvarez, M.; Huertas-Hoyas, E.; Ramón-Jiménez, A.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, C. A Pilot Study to Validate a Wearable Inertial Sensor for Gait Assessment in Older Adults with Falls. Sensors 2021, 21, 4334. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21134334

AMA Style

García-Villamil G, Neira-Álvarez M, Huertas-Hoyas E, Ramón-Jiménez A, Rodríguez-Sánchez C. A Pilot Study to Validate a Wearable Inertial Sensor for Gait Assessment in Older Adults with Falls. Sensors. 2021; 21(13):4334. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21134334

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Villamil, Guillermo, Marta Neira-Álvarez, Elisabet Huertas-Hoyas, Antonio Ramón-Jiménez, and Cristina Rodríguez-Sánchez. 2021. "A Pilot Study to Validate a Wearable Inertial Sensor for Gait Assessment in Older Adults with Falls" Sensors 21, no. 13: 4334. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21134334

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