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Pursuing the Diffraction Limit with Nano-LED Scanning Transmission Optical Microscopy

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Electronic and Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
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Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology-IN2UB, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
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Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
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Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergara”, 00133 Roma, Italy
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Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, 00-662 Warsaw, Poland
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CNR-ISM, 00128 Rome, Italy
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Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, 1210 Wien, Austria
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bruno Tiribilli
Sensors 2021, 21(10), 3305; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21103305
Received: 4 March 2021 / Revised: 4 May 2021 / Accepted: 5 May 2021 / Published: 11 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Sensing and Imaging)
Recent research into miniaturized illumination sources has prompted the development of alternative microscopy techniques. Although they are still being explored, emerging nano-light-emitting-diode (nano-LED) technologies show promise in approaching the optical resolution limit in a more feasible manner. This work presents the exploration of their capabilities with two different prototypes. In the first version, a resolution of less than 1 µm was shown thanks to a prototype based on an optically downscaled LED using an LED scanning transmission optical microscopy (STOM) technique. This research demonstrates how this technique can be used to improve STOM images by oversampling the acquisition. The second STOM-based microscope was fabricated with a 200 nm GaN LED. This demonstrates the possibilities for the miniaturization of on-chip-based microscopes. View Full-Text
Keywords: CMOS sensor; nano-LED; optical downscaling; nanopositioners; miniaturization CMOS sensor; nano-LED; optical downscaling; nanopositioners; miniaturization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Moreno, S.; Canals, J.; Moro, V.; Franch, N.; Vilà, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Prades, J.D.; Bezshlyakh, D.D.; Waag, A.; Kluczyk-Korch, K.; Auf der Maur, M.; Di Carlo, A.; Krieger, S.; Geleff, S.; Diéguez, A. Pursuing the Diffraction Limit with Nano-LED Scanning Transmission Optical Microscopy. Sensors 2021, 21, 3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21103305

AMA Style

Moreno S, Canals J, Moro V, Franch N, Vilà A, Romano-Rodriguez A, Prades JD, Bezshlyakh DD, Waag A, Kluczyk-Korch K, Auf der Maur M, Di Carlo A, Krieger S, Geleff S, Diéguez A. Pursuing the Diffraction Limit with Nano-LED Scanning Transmission Optical Microscopy. Sensors. 2021; 21(10):3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21103305

Chicago/Turabian Style

Moreno, Sergio, Joan Canals, Victor Moro, Nil Franch, Anna Vilà, Albert Romano-Rodriguez, Joan D. Prades, Daria D. Bezshlyakh, Andreas Waag, Katarzyna Kluczyk-Korch, Matthias Auf der Maur, Aldo Di Carlo, Sigurd Krieger, Silvana Geleff, and Angel Diéguez. 2021. "Pursuing the Diffraction Limit with Nano-LED Scanning Transmission Optical Microscopy" Sensors 21, no. 10: 3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21103305

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