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Article

Exploration of Brain Connectivity during Human Inhibitory Control Using Inter-Trial Coherence

by 1,2, 1,3,* and 1,2,3,4,*
1
Department of Biological Science and Technology, College of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
2
Center For Intelligent Drug Systems and Smart Bio-devices (IDS2B), National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
3
Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
4
The Drug Development and Value Creation Research Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(6), 1722; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061722
Received: 11 February 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Signal Processing)
Inhibitory control is a cognitive process that inhibits a response. It is used in everyday activities, such as driving a motorcycle, driving a car and playing a game. The effect of this process can be compared to the red traffic light in the real world. In this study, we investigated brain connectivity under human inhibitory control using the phase lag index and inter-trial coherence (ITC). The human brain connectivity gives a more accurate representation of the functional neural network. Results of electroencephalography (EEG), the data sets were generated from twelve healthy subjects during left and right hand inhibitions using the auditory stop-signal task, showed that the inter-trial coherence in delta (1–4 Hz) and theta (4–7 Hz) band powers increased over the frontal and temporal lobe of the brain. These EEG delta and theta band activities neural markers have been related to human inhibition in the frontal lobe. In addition, inter-trial coherence in the delta-theta and alpha (8–12 Hz) band powers increased at the occipital lobe through visual stimulation. Moreover, the highest brain connectivity was observed under inhibitory control in the frontal lobe between F3-F4 channels compared to temporal and occipital lobes. The greater EEG coherence and phase lag index in the frontal lobe is associated with the human response inhibition. These findings revealed new insights to understand the neural network of brain connectivity and underlying mechanisms during human response inhibition. View Full-Text
Keywords: electroencephalography (EEG); inhibitory control; brain connectivity; inter-trial coherence (ITC); frontal lobe; temporal lobe; delta band; theta band electroencephalography (EEG); inhibitory control; brain connectivity; inter-trial coherence (ITC); frontal lobe; temporal lobe; delta band; theta band
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chikara, R.K.; Lo, W.-C.; Ko, L.-W. Exploration of Brain Connectivity during Human Inhibitory Control Using Inter-Trial Coherence. Sensors 2020, 20, 1722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061722

AMA Style

Chikara RK, Lo W-C, Ko L-W. Exploration of Brain Connectivity during Human Inhibitory Control Using Inter-Trial Coherence. Sensors. 2020; 20(6):1722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chikara, Rupesh Kumar, Wei-Cheng Lo, and Li-Wei Ko. 2020. "Exploration of Brain Connectivity during Human Inhibitory Control Using Inter-Trial Coherence" Sensors 20, no. 6: 1722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061722

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