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EcoSpec: Highly Equipped Tower-Based Hyperspectral and Thermal Infrared Automatic Remote Sensing System for Investigating Plant Responses to Environmental Changes

Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
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Sensors 2020, 20(19), 5463; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195463
Received: 6 August 2020 / Revised: 5 September 2020 / Accepted: 19 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensors)
Despite an advanced ability to forecast ecosystem functions and climate at regional and global scales, little is known about relationships between local variations in water and carbon fluxes and large-scale phenomena. To enable data collection of local-scale ecosystem functions to support such investigations, we developed the EcoSpec system, a highly equipped remote sensing system that houses a hyperspectral radiometer (350–2500 nm) and five optical and infrared sensors in a compact tower. Its custom software controls the sequence and timing of movement of the sensors and system components and collects measurements at 12 locations around the tower. The data collected using the system was processed to remove sun-angle effects, and spectral vegetation indices computed from the data (i.e., the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), and Moisture Stress Index (MSI)) were compared with the fraction of photochemically active radiation (fPAR) and canopy temperature. The results showed that the NDVI, NDWI, and PRI were strongly correlated with fPAR; the MSI was correlated with canopy temperature at the diurnal scale. These correlations suggest that this type of near-surface remote sensing system would complement existing observatories to validate satellite remote sensing observations and link local and large-scale phenomena to improve our ability to forecast ecosystem functions and climate. The system is also relevant for precision agriculture to study crop growth, detect disease and pests, and compare traits of cultivars. View Full-Text
Keywords: hyperspectral remote sensing; photosynthesis; ecosystem functions; spectral reflectance; near surface; vegetation indices; photosynthetically active radiation; climate change; multiple scale; agriculture; crop monitoring hyperspectral remote sensing; photosynthesis; ecosystem functions; spectral reflectance; near surface; vegetation indices; photosynthetically active radiation; climate change; multiple scale; agriculture; crop monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hamada, Y.; Cook, D.; Bales, D. EcoSpec: Highly Equipped Tower-Based Hyperspectral and Thermal Infrared Automatic Remote Sensing System for Investigating Plant Responses to Environmental Changes. Sensors 2020, 20, 5463. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195463

AMA Style

Hamada Y, Cook D, Bales D. EcoSpec: Highly Equipped Tower-Based Hyperspectral and Thermal Infrared Automatic Remote Sensing System for Investigating Plant Responses to Environmental Changes. Sensors. 2020; 20(19):5463. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195463

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hamada, Yuki, David Cook, and Donald Bales. 2020. "EcoSpec: Highly Equipped Tower-Based Hyperspectral and Thermal Infrared Automatic Remote Sensing System for Investigating Plant Responses to Environmental Changes" Sensors 20, no. 19: 5463. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195463

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