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Open AccessArticle

Monitoring the Growth and Yield of Fruit Vegetables in a Greenhouse Using a Three-Dimensional Scanner

1
Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510, Japan
2
Faculty of Agriculture, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, Takasaki, Gunma 370-0033, Japan
3
Plant Molecular Research Center, Chiba University, Chiba 260-0856, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(18), 5270; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185270
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 11 September 2020 / Published: 15 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Agriculture Sensors)
Monitoring the growth of fruit vegetables is essential for the automation of cultivation management, and harvest. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that the current sensor technology can monitor the growth and yield of fruit vegetables such as tomato, cucumber, and paprika. We estimated leaf area, leaf area index (LAI), and plant height using coordinates of polygon vertices from plant and canopy surface models constructed using a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. A significant correlation was observed between the measured and estimated leaf area, LAI, and plant height (R2 > 0.8, except for tomato LAI). The canopy structure of each fruit vegetable was predicted by integrating the estimated leaf area at each height of the canopy surface models. A linear relationship was observed between the measured total leaf area and the total dry weight of each fruit vegetable; thus, the dry weight of the plant can be predicted using the estimated leaf area. The fruit weights of tomato and paprika were estimated using the fruit solid model constructed by the fruit point cloud data extracted using the RGB value. A significant correlation was observed between the measured and estimated fruit weights (tomato: R2 = 0.739, paprika: R2 = 0.888). Therefore, it was possible to estimate the growth parameters (leaf area, plant height, canopy structure, and yield) of different fruit vegetables non-destructively using a 3D scanner. View Full-Text
Keywords: canopy structure; Capsicum annuum; Cucumis sativus; dry matter; image analysis; leaf are index; leaf area; plant height; Solanum lycopersicum; yield canopy structure; Capsicum annuum; Cucumis sativus; dry matter; image analysis; leaf are index; leaf area; plant height; Solanum lycopersicum; yield
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ohashi, Y.; Ishigami, Y.; Goto, E. Monitoring the Growth and Yield of Fruit Vegetables in a Greenhouse Using a Three-Dimensional Scanner. Sensors 2020, 20, 5270. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185270

AMA Style

Ohashi Y, Ishigami Y, Goto E. Monitoring the Growth and Yield of Fruit Vegetables in a Greenhouse Using a Three-Dimensional Scanner. Sensors. 2020; 20(18):5270. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185270

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ohashi, Yuta; Ishigami, Yasuhiro; Goto, Eiji. 2020. "Monitoring the Growth and Yield of Fruit Vegetables in a Greenhouse Using a Three-Dimensional Scanner" Sensors 20, no. 18: 5270. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185270

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