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Article

Social STEAM Learning at an Early Age with Robotic Platforms: A Case Study in Four Schools in Spain

1
GRETEL–Research Group on Technology Enhanced Learning, La Salle Campus Barcelona, Universitat Ramon Llull, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
2
Department of Engineering, Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3698; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133698
Received: 26 May 2020 / Revised: 28 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human-Robot Interaction and Sensors for Social Robotics)
Robotics is one of the key learnings in a world where learners will interact with multiple robotic technologies and operating systems throughout their lives. However, school teachers, especially in the elementary and primary education stages, often have difficulties incorporating these tools in the classroom. Four elementary teachers in three schools in Catalonia were trained to introduce robotics in the classroom to seventy-five students. The main actions consisted in classroom accompaniment by a university-trained support teacher, curricular materials’ development, and assessment of the students’ and teachers’ learning. The designed contents and evaluation criteria took into account the potential of educational robotics to improve soft skills and to promote Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) interdisciplinary learning. Teachers perceived the training to be supportive and useful and ended the school year feeling confident with the used robotic platform (KIBO). The assessment of the students’ learning showed an average mark of 7.1–7.7 over 10 in the final evaluation criteria. Moreover, students’ learning was higher in the classes where the teachers had higher initial interest in the training. We present and analyse the actions carried out, with a critical and constructive look at extending the experience to other educational centers. View Full-Text
Keywords: educational robotics; elementary education; KIBO robot; STEAM; teacher education; human–robot interaction educational robotics; elementary education; KIBO robot; STEAM; teacher education; human–robot interaction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jurado, E.; Fonseca, D.; Coderch, J.; Canaleta, X. Social STEAM Learning at an Early Age with Robotic Platforms: A Case Study in Four Schools in Spain. Sensors 2020, 20, 3698. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133698

AMA Style

Jurado E, Fonseca D, Coderch J, Canaleta X. Social STEAM Learning at an Early Age with Robotic Platforms: A Case Study in Four Schools in Spain. Sensors. 2020; 20(13):3698. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133698

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jurado, Elena, David Fonseca, Jorge Coderch, and Xavi Canaleta. 2020. "Social STEAM Learning at an Early Age with Robotic Platforms: A Case Study in Four Schools in Spain" Sensors 20, no. 13: 3698. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133698

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