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Open AccessArticle

Improved Active Disturbance Rejection Control for Trajectory Tracking Control of Lower Limb Robotic Rehabilitation Exoskeleton

1
Department of Instrumentation Engineering, Shri Guru Gobind Singhji Institute of Engineering and Technology, Nanded 431606, Maharashtra, India
2
Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar 32610, Perak Darul Ridzuan, Malaysia
3
ImViA, University of Burgundy, Maison de l’université, 21078 Dijon, Le Creusot, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3681; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133681
Received: 5 April 2020 / Revised: 22 May 2020 / Accepted: 28 May 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors and Robot Control)
Neurological disorders such as cerebral paralysis, spinal cord injuries, and strokes, result in the impairment of motor control and induce functional difficulties to human beings like walking, standing, etc. Physical injuries due to accidents and muscular weaknesses caused by aging affect people and can cause them to lose their ability to perform daily routine functions. In order to help people recover or improve their dysfunctional activities and quality of life after accidents or strokes, assistive devices like exoskeletons and orthoses are developed. Control strategies for control of exoskeletons are developed with the desired intention of improving the quality of treatment. Amongst recent control strategies used for rehabilitation robots, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) strategy is a systematic way out from a robust control paradox with possibilities and promises. In this modern era, we always try to find the solution in order to have minimum resources and maximum output, and in robotics-control, to approach the same condition observer-based control strategies is an added advantage where it uses a state estimation method which reduces the requirement of sensors that is used for measuring every state. This paper introduces improved active disturbance rejection control (I-ADRC) controllers as a combination of linear extended state observer (LESO), tracking differentiator (TD), and nonlinear state error feedback (NLSEF). The proposed controllers were evaluated through simulation by investigating the sagittal plane gait trajectory tracking performance of two degrees of freedom, Lower Limb Robotic Rehabilitation Exoskeleton (LLRRE). This multiple input multiple output (MIMO) LLRRE has two joints, one at the hip and other at the knee. In the simulation study, the proposed controllers show reduced trajectory tracking error, elimination of random, constant, and harmonic disturbances, robustness against parameter variations, and under the influence of noise, with improvement in performance indices, indicates its enhanced tracking performance. These promising simulation results would be validated experimentally in the next phase of research. View Full-Text
Keywords: improved active disturbance rejection control (I-ADRC); lower limb robotic rehabilitation exoskeleton (LLRRE); trajectory tracking; linear extended state observer (LESO); tracking differentiator (TD); nonlinear state error feedback (NLSEF) improved active disturbance rejection control (I-ADRC); lower limb robotic rehabilitation exoskeleton (LLRRE); trajectory tracking; linear extended state observer (LESO); tracking differentiator (TD); nonlinear state error feedback (NLSEF)
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Aole, S.; Elamvazuthi, I.; Waghmare, L.; Patre, B.; Meriaudeau, F. Improved Active Disturbance Rejection Control for Trajectory Tracking Control of Lower Limb Robotic Rehabilitation Exoskeleton. Sensors 2020, 20, 3681.

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