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Open AccessArticle

Estimation of Heart Rate Recovery after Stair Climbing Using a Wrist-Worn Device

Biomedical Engineering Institute, Kaunas University of Technology, 51423 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Sensors 2019, 19(9), 2113; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19092113
Received: 15 April 2019 / Revised: 2 May 2019 / Accepted: 4 May 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
Heart rate recovery (HRR) after physical exercise is a convenient method to assess cardiovascular autonomic function. Since stair climbing is a common daily activity, usually followed by a slow walking or rest, this type of activity can be considered as an alternative HRR test. The present study explores the feasibility to estimate HRR parameters after stair climbing using a wrist-worn device with embedded photoplethysmography and barometric pressure sensors. A custom-made wrist-worn device, capable of acquiring heart rate and altitude, was used to estimate the time-constant of exponential decay τ , the short-term time constant S , and the decay of heart rate in 1 min D . Fifty-four healthy volunteers were instructed to climb the stairs at three different climbing rates. When compared to the reference electrocardiogram, the absolute and percentage errors were found to be ≤ 21.0 s (≤ 52.7%) for τ , ≤ 0.14 (≤ 19.2%) for S , and ≤ 7.16 bpm (≤ 20.7%) for D in 75% of recovery phases available for analysis. The proposed approach to monitoring HRR parameters in an unobtrusive way may complement information provided by personal health monitoring devices (e.g., weight loss, physical activity), as well as have clinical relevance when evaluating the efficiency of cardiac rehabilitation program outside the clinical setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart wristband; photoplethysmography; barometric pressure; altitude; physical activity; heart rate response; activities of daily living; long-term monitoring smart wristband; photoplethysmography; barometric pressure; altitude; physical activity; heart rate response; activities of daily living; long-term monitoring
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Sokas, D.; Petrėnas, A.; Daukantas, S.; Rapalis, A.; Paliakaitė, B.; Marozas, V. Estimation of Heart Rate Recovery after Stair Climbing Using a Wrist-Worn Device. Sensors 2019, 19, 2113.

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