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Open AccessArticle

Detection of Simulated Fukushima Daichii Fuel Debris Using a Remotely Operated Vehicle at the Naraha Test Facility

1
School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M1 3BB, UK
2
Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW, UK
3
Department of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka 940-2188, Japan
4
Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Iwaki 970-8026, Japan
5
Marine Risk Assessment Department, National Maritime Research Institute, Mitaka 181-0004, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Sensors 2019, 19(20), 4602; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19204602
Received: 23 July 2019 / Revised: 27 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 October 2019 / Published: 22 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Positioning and Navigation)
The use of robotics in harsh environments, such as nuclear decommissioning, has increased in recent years. Environments such as the Fukushima Daiichi accident site from 2011 and the Sellafield legacy ponds highlight the need for robotic systems capable of deployment in hazardous environments unsafe for human workers. To characterise these environments, it is important to develop robust and accurate localization systems that can be combined with mapping techniques to create 3D reconstructions of the unknown environment. This paper describes the development and experimental verification of a localization system for an underwater robot, which enabled the collection of sonar data to create 3D images of submerged simulated fuel debris. The system was demonstrated at the Naraha test facility, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Using a camera with a bird’s-eye view of the simulated primary containment vessel, the 3D position and attitude of the robot was obtained using coloured LED markers (active markers) on the robot, landmarks on the test-rig (passive markers), and a depth sensor on the robot. The successful reconstruction of a 3D image has been created through use of a robot operating system (ROS) node in real-time. View Full-Text
Keywords: robotics; nuclear characterization; underwater; submersible; ROV; 3D reconstruction; mapping; localization; vision robotics; nuclear characterization; underwater; submersible; ROV; 3D reconstruction; mapping; localization; vision
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Nancekievill, M.; Espinosa, J.; Watson, S.; Lennox, B.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M.J.; Katakura, J.-I.; Okumura, K.; Kamada, S.; Katoh, M.; Nishimura, K. Detection of Simulated Fukushima Daichii Fuel Debris Using a Remotely Operated Vehicle at the Naraha Test Facility. Sensors 2019, 19, 4602.

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