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Open AccessArticle

Validation of Wearable Sensors during Team Sport-Specific Movements in Indoor Environments

1
Institute of Sports and Sports Science (IfSS), Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schwarzwaldstraße 175, 79117 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
2
Sport-Club Freiburg e.V., Schwarzwaldstraße 193, 79117 Freiburg, Germany
3
Institute of Applied Health Promotion and Exercise Medicine (IfAG), Furtwangen University, Robert-Gerwig-Platz 1, 78120 Furtwangen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2019, 19(16), 3458; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19163458
Received: 18 June 2019 / Revised: 18 July 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 7 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inertial Sensors for Activity Recognition and Classification)
The aim of this study was to determine possible influences, including data processing and sport-specific demands, on the validity of acceleration measures by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) in indoor environments. IMU outputs were compared to a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis (MA) system and processed with two sensor fusion algorithms (Kalman filter, KF; Complementary filter, CF) at temporal resolutions of 100, 10, and 5 Hz. Athletes performed six team sport-specific movements whilst wearing a single IMU. Mean and peak acceleration magnitudes were analyzed. Over all trials (n = 1093), KF data overestimated MA resultant acceleration by 0.42 ± 0.31 m∙s−2 for mean and 4.18 ± 3.68 m∙s−2 for peak values, while CF processing showed errors of up to 0.57 ± 0.41 m∙s−2 and −2.31 ± 2.25 m∙s−2, respectively. Resampling to 5 Hz decreased the absolute error by about 14% for mean and 56% for peak values. Still, higher acceleration magnitudes led to a large increase in error. These results indicate that IMUs can be used for assessing accelerations in indoor team sports with acceptable means. Application of a CF and resampling to 5 Hz is recommended. High-acceleration magnitudes impair validity to a large degree and should be interpreted with caution. View Full-Text
Keywords: player monitoring; inertial measurement unit; wearables; sensor fusion; indoor team sports player monitoring; inertial measurement unit; wearables; sensor fusion; indoor team sports
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Roell, M.; Mahler, H.; Lienhard, J.; Gehring, D.; Gollhofer, A.; Roecker, K. Validation of Wearable Sensors during Team Sport-Specific Movements in Indoor Environments. Sensors 2019, 19, 3458.

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