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Open AccessArticle

Support for Employees with ASD in the Workplace Using a Bluetooth Skin Resistance Sensor–A Preliminary Study

1
Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdańsk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk, Poland
2
Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdańsk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2018, 18(10), 3530; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18103530
Received: 7 September 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor Technologies for Caring People with Disabilities)
The application of a Bluetooth skin resistance sensor in assisting people with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), in their day-to-day work, is presented in this paper. The design and construction of the device are discussed. The authors have considered the best placement of the sensor, on the body, to gain the most accurate readings of user stress levels, under various conditions. Trial tests were performed on a group of sixteen people to verify the correct functioning of the device. Resistance levels were compared to those from the reference system. The placement of the sensor has also been determined, based on wearer convenience. With the Bluetooth Low Energy block, users can be notified immediately about their abnormal stress levels via a smartphone application. This can help people with ASD, and those who work with them, to facilitate stress control and make necessary adjustments to their work environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: Autism Spectrum Disorders; employees; workplace; skin resistance sensor; Bluetooth sensor; Bluetooth Autism Spectrum Disorders; employees; workplace; skin resistance sensor; Bluetooth sensor; Bluetooth
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Tomczak, M.T.; Wójcikowski, M.; Listewnik, P.; Pankiewicz, B.; Majchrowicz, D.; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, M. Support for Employees with ASD in the Workplace Using a Bluetooth Skin Resistance Sensor–A Preliminary Study. Sensors 2018, 18, 3530.

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