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Review

Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

1
Centre for Vision Research, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
2
Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste Marie, ON P6A 2E5, Canada
3
Flight Research Lab, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, M-3, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ingolf Willms
Sensors 2016, 16(8), 1310; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16081310
Received: 19 April 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2016 / Accepted: 10 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Fire Detection)
For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildfire; fire detection; fire monitoring; airborne sensors; fire spotting; detection patrols; unmanned aerial vehicles wildfire; fire detection; fire monitoring; airborne sensors; fire spotting; detection patrols; unmanned aerial vehicles
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MDPI and ACS Style

Allison, R.S.; Johnston, J.M.; Craig, G.; Jennings, S. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring. Sensors 2016, 16, 1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16081310

AMA Style

Allison RS, Johnston JM, Craig G, Jennings S. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring. Sensors. 2016; 16(8):1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16081310

Chicago/Turabian Style

Allison, Robert S., Joshua M. Johnston, Gregory Craig, and Sion Jennings. 2016. "Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring" Sensors 16, no. 8: 1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16081310

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