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Potential Distribution of Colonizing Nine-Banded Armadillos at Their Northern Range Edge

1
Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
2
School of Biological Sciences, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael Wink
Diversity 2021, 13(6), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060266
Received: 27 May 2021 / Revised: 9 June 2021 / Accepted: 9 June 2021 / Published: 13 June 2021
The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) has become a recent addition to the local fauna of Illinois as a response to habitat alteration and climate change. This range expansion has resulted in the presence of armadillos in areas not predicted by earlier models. Although these models have been revised, armadillos continue to move north and have reached areas of heavy agricultural use. We identified conditions that favor the presence of armadillos and potential corridors for dispersal. Identifying the distribution of the armadillo in Illinois is a vital step in anticipating their arrival in areas containing potentially sensitive wildlife populations and habitats. Armadillo locations (n = 37) collected during 2016–2020 were used to develop a map of the potential distribution of armadillos in southern Illinois. Environmental data layers included in the model were land cover type, distance to water, distance to forest edge, human modification, and climactic variables. Land cover type was the most important contributing variable to the model. Our results are consistent with the tenet that armadillo activity and dispersal corridors are centered around riparian areas, and that forested cover may provide corridors an agricultural mosaic. View Full-Text
Keywords: armadillo; Dasypus novemcinctus; Illinois; species distribution model; range expansion; MaxEnt armadillo; Dasypus novemcinctus; Illinois; species distribution model; range expansion; MaxEnt
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haywood, C.J.; Nielsen, C.K.; Jiménez, F.A. Potential Distribution of Colonizing Nine-Banded Armadillos at Their Northern Range Edge. Diversity 2021, 13, 266. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060266

AMA Style

Haywood CJ, Nielsen CK, Jiménez FA. Potential Distribution of Colonizing Nine-Banded Armadillos at Their Northern Range Edge. Diversity. 2021; 13(6):266. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060266

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haywood, Carly J., Clayton K. Nielsen, and F. A. Jiménez 2021. "Potential Distribution of Colonizing Nine-Banded Armadillos at Their Northern Range Edge" Diversity 13, no. 6: 266. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060266

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