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Article

Predation Pressure of Invasive Marsh Frogs: A Threat to Native Amphibians?

Laboratory of Ecology and Conservation of Amphibians (LECA), Freshwater and Oceanic Science Unit of Research (FOCUS), University of Liège, 4020 Liege, Belgium
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Academic Editor: Michael Wink
Diversity 2021, 13(11), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110595
Received: 27 October 2021 / Revised: 15 November 2021 / Accepted: 16 November 2021 / Published: 19 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2021 Feature Papers by Diversity’s Editorial Board Members)
Anurans have been introduced in many parts of the world and have often become invasive over large geographic areas. Although predation is involved in the declines of invaded amphibian populations, there is a lack of quantitative assessments evaluating the potential risk posed to native species. This is particularly true for Pelophylax water frogs, which have invaded large parts of western Europe, but no studies to date have examined their predation on other amphibians in their invaded range. Predation of native amphibians by marsh frogs (Pelophylax ridibundus) was assessed by stomach flushing once a month over four months in 21 ponds in southern France. Nine percent of stomachs contained amphibians. Seasonality was a major determinant of amphibian consumption. This effect was mediated by body size, with the largest invaders ingesting bigger natives, such as tree frogs. These results show that invasive marsh frogs represent a threat through their ability to forage on natives, particularly at the adult stage. The results also indicate that large numbers of native amphibians are predated. More broadly, the fact that predation was site- and time-specific highlights the need for repeated samplings across habitats and key periods for a clear understanding of the impact of invaders. View Full-Text
Keywords: amphibian decline; invasive alien species; predatory risk; size-selective predation; Pelophylax ridibundus; water frogs amphibian decline; invasive alien species; predatory risk; size-selective predation; Pelophylax ridibundus; water frogs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pille, F.; Pinto, L.; Denoël, M. Predation Pressure of Invasive Marsh Frogs: A Threat to Native Amphibians? Diversity 2021, 13, 595. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110595

AMA Style

Pille F, Pinto L, Denoël M. Predation Pressure of Invasive Marsh Frogs: A Threat to Native Amphibians? Diversity. 2021; 13(11):595. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110595

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pille, Fabien, Laura Pinto, and Mathieu Denoël. 2021. "Predation Pressure of Invasive Marsh Frogs: A Threat to Native Amphibians?" Diversity 13, no. 11: 595. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110595

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