Next Article in Journal
Wildlife Trade Influencing Natural Parrot Populations on a Biodiverse Indonesian Island
Next Article in Special Issue
An Overview of Subterranean Biodiversity Hotspots
Previous Article in Journal
Embryonic Development of the Avian Sternum and Its Morphological Adaptations for Optimizing Locomotion
Previous Article in Special Issue
Correction: Brad et al. The Chemoautotrophically Based Movile Cave Groundwater Ecosystem, a Hotspot of Subterranean Biodiversity. Diversity 2021, 13, 128
 
 
Article

A Hotspot of Arid Zone Subterranean Biodiversity: The Robe Valley in Western Australia

1
Bennelongia Environmental Consultants, 5 Bishop Street, Jolimont, WA 6014, Australia
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, 6 Wally’s Walk, Macquarie Park, NSW 2109, Australia
3
School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tanja Pipan, David C. Culver and Louis Deharveng
Diversity 2021, 13(10), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100482
Received: 9 September 2021 / Revised: 27 September 2021 / Accepted: 29 September 2021 / Published: 30 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hotspots of Subterranean Biodiversity)
Knowledge of subterranean fauna has mostly been derived from caves and streambeds, which are relatively easily accessed. In contrast, subterranean fauna inhabiting regional groundwater aquifers or the vadose zone (between surface soil layers and the watertable) is difficult to sample. Here we provide species lists for a globally significant subterranean fauna hotspot in the Robe Valley of the Pilbara region, Western Australia. This fauna was collected from up to 50 m below ground level using mining exploration drill holes and monitoring wells. Altogether, 123 subterranean species were collected over a distance of 17 km, comprising 65 troglofauna and 58 stygofauna species. Of these, 61 species were troglobionts and 48 stygobionts. The troglofauna occurs in small voids and fissures in mesas comprised mostly of an iron ore formation, while the stygofauna occurs in the alluvium of a river floodplain. The richness of the Robe Valley is not a localized aberration, but rather reflects the richness of the arid Pilbara region. While legislation in Western Australia has recognized the importance of subterranean fauna, mining is occurring in the Robe Valley hotspot with conditions of environmental approval that are designed to ensure species persistence. View Full-Text
Keywords: stygobiont; troglobiont; conservation; groundwater; arid zone; mining stygobiont; troglobiont; conservation; groundwater; arid zone; mining
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Clark, H.L.; Buzatto, B.A.; Halse, S.A. A Hotspot of Arid Zone Subterranean Biodiversity: The Robe Valley in Western Australia. Diversity 2021, 13, 482. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100482

AMA Style

Clark HL, Buzatto BA, Halse SA. A Hotspot of Arid Zone Subterranean Biodiversity: The Robe Valley in Western Australia. Diversity. 2021; 13(10):482. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100482

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clark, Huon L., Bruno A. Buzatto, and Stuart A. Halse. 2021. "A Hotspot of Arid Zone Subterranean Biodiversity: The Robe Valley in Western Australia" Diversity 13, no. 10: 482. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100482

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop