Next Article in Journal
Culture Collections as Hidden Sources of Microbial Biomolecules and Biodiversity
Previous Article in Journal
Is the Distribution of Two Rare Orchis Sister Species Limited by Their Main Mycobiont?
Open AccessArticle

The Importance of Genomics for Deciphering the Invasion Success of the Seagrass Halophila stipulacea in the Changing Mediterranean Sea

1
Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, PO Box 2214, 71003 Heraklion, Greece
2
Institute of Oceanography, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, PO Box 2214, 71003 Heraklion, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(7), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12070263
Received: 27 April 2020 / Revised: 24 June 2020 / Accepted: 24 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Marine Diversity)
The Mediterranean Sea is subject to pressures from biological invasion due to coastal anthropic activities and global warming, which potentially modify its biogeography. The Red Sea tropical seagrass Halophila stipulacea entered the Eastern Mediterranean over a century ago, and its occurrence is expanding towards the northwest. Here, we highlight the importance of genomics for deciphering the evolutionary and ecological procedures taking place during the invasion process of H. stipulacea and review the relatively sparse genetic information available for the species to date. We report the first draft whole-genome sequencing of a H. stipulacea individual from Greece, based on Illumina Sequencing technology. A comparison of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions revealed a high divergence of the herein sequenced individual compared to Mediterranean populations sequenced two decades ago, rendering further questions on the evolutionary processes taking place during H. stipulacea adaptation in the invaded Mediterranean Sea. Our work sets the baseline for a future analysis of the invasion genomic of the focal species. View Full-Text
Keywords: macrophyte; climate change; exotic species; non-indigenous species; Eastern Mediterranean; genetics; genomic macrophyte; climate change; exotic species; non-indigenous species; Eastern Mediterranean; genetics; genomic
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tsakogiannis, A.; Manousaki, T.; Anagnostopoulou, V.; Stavroulaki, M.; Apostolaki, E.T. The Importance of Genomics for Deciphering the Invasion Success of the Seagrass Halophila stipulacea in the Changing Mediterranean Sea. Diversity 2020, 12, 263. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12070263

AMA Style

Tsakogiannis A, Manousaki T, Anagnostopoulou V, Stavroulaki M, Apostolaki ET. The Importance of Genomics for Deciphering the Invasion Success of the Seagrass Halophila stipulacea in the Changing Mediterranean Sea. Diversity. 2020; 12(7):263. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12070263

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tsakogiannis, Alexandros; Manousaki, Tereza; Anagnostopoulou, Vasileia; Stavroulaki, Melanthia; Apostolaki, Eugenia T. 2020. "The Importance of Genomics for Deciphering the Invasion Success of the Seagrass Halophila stipulacea in the Changing Mediterranean Sea" Diversity 12, no. 7: 263. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12070263

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop