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Article

Lepidoptera are Relevant Bioindicators of Passive Regeneration in Tropical Dry Forests

1
Laboratoire écologie fonctionnelle et environnement, Université Paul Sabatier, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse, France
2
Centro de Educación Ambiental e Investigación Sierra de Huautla, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca 62209, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(6), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12060231
Received: 12 April 2020 / Revised: 19 May 2020 / Accepted: 4 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Diversity of Lepidopteras)
Most evaluations of passive regeneration/natural succession or restoration have dealt with tropical rain forest or temperate ecosystems. Very few studies have examined the regeneration of tropical dry forests (TDF), one of the most damaged ecosystem types in the world. Owing to their species diversity and abundance, insects have been widely used as bioindicators of restoration. Butterflies were among the most abundant and useful groups. We sampled four sites with different levels of anthropogenic disturbance in a Mexican TDF (Morelos State) and compared butterfly communities. A first goal was to examine whether adult butterflies were significant bioindicators owing to their specificity to restricted habitats. A second aim was to determine if differences exist in butterfly communities between some fields abandoned from 4–8, 8–15 and 15–30 years and a reference zone considered as primary forest. We found 40% to 50% of the species of butterflies were specifically related to a habitat and/or a level of anthropogenic disturbance. The time it takes for passive regeneration and recovery of the Mexican tropical dry forest is much higher than 25 years (our older zone), considering that almost none of the butterflies found in our conserved reference zone were present in our 25 year aged study zone. View Full-Text
Keywords: dry broadleaf forest; Mexico; butterflies; bioindicators; abandoned fields; Sierra de Huautla UNESCO Biosphere Reserve dry broadleaf forest; Mexico; butterflies; bioindicators; abandoned fields; Sierra de Huautla UNESCO Biosphere Reserve
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MDPI and ACS Style

Legal, L.; Valet, M.; Dorado, O.; Jesus-Almonte, J.M.d.; López, K.; Céréghino, R. Lepidoptera are Relevant Bioindicators of Passive Regeneration in Tropical Dry Forests. Diversity 2020, 12, 231. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12060231

AMA Style

Legal L, Valet M, Dorado O, Jesus-Almonte JMd, López K, Céréghino R. Lepidoptera are Relevant Bioindicators of Passive Regeneration in Tropical Dry Forests. Diversity. 2020; 12(6):231. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12060231

Chicago/Turabian Style

Legal, Luc, Marine Valet, Oscar Dorado, Jose M.d. Jesus-Almonte, Karime López, and Régis Céréghino. 2020. "Lepidoptera are Relevant Bioindicators of Passive Regeneration in Tropical Dry Forests" Diversity 12, no. 6: 231. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12060231

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