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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2003, 4(2), 22-33; https://doi.org/10.3390/i4020022

Effect of Antioxidant (Turmeric, Turmerin and Curcumin) on Human Immunodeficiency Virus

1
Department of Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA
2
Faculty of Medicine and Division of Infectious Diseases, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 June 2002 / Accepted: 30 October 2002 / Published: 31 January 2003
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Abstract

Oxidative stress is implicated in HIV-infection. It has been suggested that plant antioxidants may offer protection from viral replication and cell death associated with oxidative stress in patients with HIV/AIDS. Because of inherent antioxidant properties of turmeric (T) and its derivatives, water-soluble extract turmerin (Tm) and lipid soluble curcumin (Cu), their potential efficacy as anti-HIV drugs were examined. Cell viability and p-24 antigen release by CEMss-T cells (1 x 105 cells/ml) infected with HIV-IIIB strain, used as an acute model of infection, were tested in the presence of 3’azido-3’deoxythmidine (AZT). Proliferative responses of human mononuclear cells derived from HIV patients (chronic model) stimulated with phyohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were also examined in the presence of AZT and Tm. In the infection assay, T, Tm and Cu individually did not reduce p-24 antigen release or improve cell viability. AZT (5μM) + Tm (800 ng/ml) inhibited infection by 37 % and increased cell numbers by 30%; whereas, Tm (80 ng/ml) inhibited infection by 26% and increased cell number by 60%. In the proliferation assay, lymphocytes from HIV-infected patients showed better inhibition of mitogen responsiveness to Tm (800 ng/ml) when compared to AZT at 5 μM or Tm at 80 ng/ml. Turmerin inhibited HIV-infected T-cell proliferation and, in combination with AZT, decreased T-cell infection and increased cell viability. These data provide evidence suggesting that efficacious anti-HIV therapy may be possible using lower, less toxic doses of AZT in the presence of turmerin. View Full-Text
Keywords: Turmeric; turmerin; curcumin; p-24 antigen; proliferation Turmeric; turmerin; curcumin; p-24 antigen; proliferation
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Cohly, H.H.P.; Asad, S.; Das, S.K.; Angel, M.F.; Rao, M. Effect of Antioxidant (Turmeric, Turmerin and Curcumin) on Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2003, 4, 22-33.

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