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Review

The Effects of Stress and Diet on the “Brain–Gut” and “Gut–Brain” Pathways in Animal Models of Stress and Depression

Health and Biomedical Innovation, Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Academic Editor: Changjong Moon
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(4), 2013; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23042013
Received: 7 December 2021 / Revised: 7 February 2022 / Accepted: 8 February 2022 / Published: 11 February 2022
Compelling evidence is building for the involvement of the complex, bidirectional communication axis between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain in neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. With depression projected to be the number one health concern by 2030 and its pathophysiology yet to be fully elucidated, a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between environmental factors, such as stress and diet, with the neurobiology of depression is needed. In this review, the latest research on the effects of stress on the bidirectional connections between the brain and the gut across the most widely used animal models of stress and depression is summarised, followed by comparisons of the diversity and composition of the gut microbiota across animal models of stress and depression with possible implications for the gut–brain axis and the impact of dietary changes on these. The composition of the gut microbiota was consistently altered across the animal models investigated, although differences between each of the studies and models existed. Chronic stressors appeared to have negative effects on both brain and gut health, while supplementation with prebiotics and/or probiotics show promise in alleviating depression pathophysiology. View Full-Text
Keywords: animal; depression; diet; gut–brain axis; microbiota; pathways; prebiotics; probiotics; stress animal; depression; diet; gut–brain axis; microbiota; pathways; prebiotics; probiotics; stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Herselman, M.F.; Bailey, S.; Bobrovskaya, L. The Effects of Stress and Diet on the “Brain–Gut” and “Gut–Brain” Pathways in Animal Models of Stress and Depression. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23, 2013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23042013

AMA Style

Herselman MF, Bailey S, Bobrovskaya L. The Effects of Stress and Diet on the “Brain–Gut” and “Gut–Brain” Pathways in Animal Models of Stress and Depression. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2022; 23(4):2013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23042013

Chicago/Turabian Style

Herselman, Mauritz F., Sheree Bailey, and Larisa Bobrovskaya. 2022. "The Effects of Stress and Diet on the “Brain–Gut” and “Gut–Brain” Pathways in Animal Models of Stress and Depression" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 23, no. 4: 2013. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23042013

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