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The In Vivo Selection Method in Breast Cancer Metastasis

1
Division of Cellular Signaling, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
2
Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan
3
Department of Cell Factory, Translational Research Center, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yusuke Oshima
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(4), 1886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22041886
Received: 12 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 11 February 2021 / Published: 14 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms in Cancer Metastasis II)
Metastasis is a complex event in cancer progression and causes most deaths from cancer. Repeated transplantation of metastatic cancer cells derived from transplanted murine organs can be used to select the population of highly metastatic cancer cells; this method is called as in vivo selection. The in vivo selection method and highly metastatic cancer cell lines have contributed to reveal the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis. Here, we present an overview of the methodology for the in vivo selection method. Recent comparative analysis of the transplantation methods for metastasis have revealed the divergence of metastasis gene signatures. Even cancer cells that metastasize to the same organ show various metastatic cascades and gene expression patterns by changing the transplantation method for the in vivo selection. These findings suggest that the selection of metastasis models for the study of metastasis gene signatures has the potential to influence research results. The study of novel gene signatures that are identified from novel highly metastatic cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) will be helpful for understanding the novel mechanisms of metastasis. View Full-Text
Keywords: metastasis; in vivo selection; highly metastatic cancer cell line; breast cancer; xenograft model metastasis; in vivo selection; highly metastatic cancer cell line; breast cancer; xenograft model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nakayama, J.; Han, Y.; Kuroiwa, Y.; Azuma, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Semba, K. The In Vivo Selection Method in Breast Cancer Metastasis. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 1886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22041886

AMA Style

Nakayama J, Han Y, Kuroiwa Y, Azuma K, Yamamoto Y, Semba K. The In Vivo Selection Method in Breast Cancer Metastasis. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(4):1886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22041886

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nakayama, Jun; Han, Yuxuan; Kuroiwa, Yuka; Azuma, Kazushi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Semba, Kentaro. 2021. "The In Vivo Selection Method in Breast Cancer Metastasis" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, no. 4: 1886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22041886

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