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Article

Global Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Embryogenic Callus Induction in Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.)

by 1,2,3, 1,2,3, 1,2,3, 1,2, 1,2, 1,2,3,4,* and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Forestry, College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou 510642, China
3
Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou 510642, China
4
State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bartolome Sabater
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(22), 12130; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212130
Received: 9 October 2021 / Revised: 1 November 2021 / Accepted: 6 November 2021 / Published: 9 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
The plant embryogenic callus (EC) is an irregular embryogenic cell mass with strong regenerative ability that can be used for propagation and genetic transformation. However, difficulties with EC induction have hindered the breeding of drumstick, a tree with diverse potential commercial uses. In this study, three drumstick EC cDNA libraries were sequenced using an Illumina NovaSeq 6000 system. A total of 7191 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for embryogenic callus development were identified, of which 2325 were mapped to the KEGG database, with the categories of plant hormone signal transduction and Plant-pathogen interaction being well-represented. The results obtained suggest that auxin and cytokinin metabolism and several embryogenesis-labeled genes are involved in embryogenic callus induction. Additionally, 589 transcription factors from 20 different families were differentially expressed during EC formation. The differential expression of 16 unigenes related to auxin signaling pathways was validated experimentally by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) using samples representing three sequential developmental stages of drumstick EC, supporting their apparent involvement in drumstick EC formation. Our study provides valuable information about the molecular mechanism of EC formation and has revealed new genes involved in this process. View Full-Text
Keywords: Moringa oleifera; embryogenic callus; transcriptome; differentially expressed genes Moringa oleifera; embryogenic callus; transcriptome; differentially expressed genes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, E.; Zheng, M.; Zou, X.; Huang, X.; Yang, H.; Chen, X.; Zhang, J. Global Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Embryogenic Callus Induction in Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 12130. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212130

AMA Style

Yang E, Zheng M, Zou X, Huang X, Yang H, Chen X, Zhang J. Global Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Embryogenic Callus Induction in Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.). International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(22):12130. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212130

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yang, Endian, Mingyang Zheng, Xuan Zou, Xiaoling Huang, Heyue Yang, Xiaoyang Chen, and Junjie Zhang. 2021. "Global Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Embryogenic Callus Induction in Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.)" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 22: 12130. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212130

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