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Article

Tailoring Pyro- and Orthophosphate Species to Enhance Stem Cell Adhesion to Phosphate Glasses

1
School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
2
Advanced Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
3
Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Noakhali Science and Technology University, Noakhali 3814, Bangladesh
4
School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
5
Department of Molecular Medicine, The University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(2), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020837
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 11 January 2021 / Accepted: 13 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
Phosphate-based glasses (PBGs) offer significant therapeutic potential due to their bioactivity, controllable compositions, and degradation rates. Several PBGs have already demonstrated their ability to support direct cell growth and in vivo cytocompatibility for bone repair applications. This study investigated development of PBG formulations with pyro- and orthophosphate species within the glass system (40 − x)P2O5·(16 + x)CaO·20Na2O·24MgO (x = 0, 5, 10 mol%) and their effect on stem cell adhesion properties. Substitution of phosphate for calcium revealed a gradual transition within the glass structure from Q2 to Q0 phosphate species. Human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured directly onto discs made from three PBG compositions. Analysis of cells seeded onto the discs revealed that PBG with higher concentration of pyro- and orthophosphate content (61% Q1 and 39% Q0) supported a 4.3-fold increase in adhered cells compared to glasses with metaphosphate connectivity (49% Q2 and 51% Q1). This study highlights that tuning the composition of PBGs to possess pyro- and orthophosphate species only, enables the possibility to control cell adhesion performance. PBGs with superior cell adhesion profiles represent ideal candidates for biomedical applications, where cell recruitment and support for tissue ingrowth are of critical importance for orthopaedic interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomaterials; stem cells; phosphate-based glasses; cell culture; material degradation biomaterials; stem cells; phosphate-based glasses; cell culture; material degradation
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Melo, N.; Murrell, L.; Islam, M.T.; Titman, J.J.; Macri-Pellizzeri, L.; Ahmed, I.; Sottile, V. Tailoring Pyro- and Orthophosphate Species to Enhance Stem Cell Adhesion to Phosphate Glasses. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020837

AMA Style

De Melo N, Murrell L, Islam MT, Titman JJ, Macri-Pellizzeri L, Ahmed I, Sottile V. Tailoring Pyro- and Orthophosphate Species to Enhance Stem Cell Adhesion to Phosphate Glasses. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(2):837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020837

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Melo, Nigel, Lauren Murrell, Md T. Islam, Jeremy J. Titman, Laura Macri-Pellizzeri, Ifty Ahmed, and Virginie Sottile. 2021. "Tailoring Pyro- and Orthophosphate Species to Enhance Stem Cell Adhesion to Phosphate Glasses" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 2: 837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020837

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