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Open AccessArticle

Changes in the Substrate Source Reveal Novel Interactions in the Sediment-Derived Methanogenic Microbial Community

1
Department of Biochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Biotechnology, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Konstantynów Street 1 I, 20-708 Lublin, Poland
2
Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation–State Research Institute (IUNG-PIB), Czartoryskich Street 8, 24-100 Puławy, Poland
3
Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Doświadczalna Street 4, 20-290 Lublin, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(18), 4415; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20184415
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 5 September 2019 / Accepted: 6 September 2019 / Published: 8 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Microbiology)
Methanogenesis occurs in many natural environments and is used in biotechnology for biogas production. The efficiency of methane production depends on the microbiome structure that determines interspecies electron transfer. In this research, the microbial community retrieved from mining subsidence reservoir sediment was used to establish enrichment cultures on media containing different carbon sources (tryptone, yeast extract, acetate, CO2/H2). The microbiome composition and methane production rate of the cultures were screened as a function of the substrate and transition stage. The relationships between the microorganisms involved in methane formation were the major focus of this study. Methanogenic consortia were identified by next generation sequencing (NGS) and functional genes connected with organic matter transformation were predicted using the PICRUSt approach and annotated in the KEGG. The methane production rate (exceeding 12.8 mg CH4 L−1 d−1) was highest in the culture grown with tryptone, yeast extract, and CO2/H2. The analysis of communities that developed on various carbon sources casts new light on the ecophysiology of the recently described bacterial phylum Caldiserica and methanogenic Archaea representing the genera Methanomassiliicoccus and Methanothrix. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that representatives of Caldiserica may support hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. View Full-Text
Keywords: methanogenesis; bottom sediments; enrichment culture; Caldiserica; Methanothrix; Methanomassiliicoccus methanogenesis; bottom sediments; enrichment culture; Caldiserica; Methanothrix; Methanomassiliicoccus
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Szafranek-Nakonieczna, A.; Pytlak, A.; Grządziel, J.; Kubaczyński, A.; Banach, A.; Górski, A.; Goraj, W.; Kuźniar, A.; Gałązka, A.; Stępniewska, Z. Changes in the Substrate Source Reveal Novel Interactions in the Sediment-Derived Methanogenic Microbial Community. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 4415.

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