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Open AccessArticle

The Kidney Clock Contributes to Timekeeping by the Master Circadian Clock

by Jihwan Myung 1,2,3,4,*,†, Mei-Yi Wu 5,6,7,†, Chun-Ya Lee 3,5,†, Amalia Ridla Rahim 1,2,3, Vuong Hung Truong 1,2,3, Dean Wu 8,9, Hugh David Piggins 10 and Mai-Szu Wu 5,6,*
1
Graduate Institute of Mind, Brain and Consciousness, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
2
Brain and Consciousness Research Center, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
3
Laboratory of Braintime, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031 & Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
4
Computational Neuroscience Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan
5
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
6
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
7
Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10672, Taiwan
8
Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
9
Department of Neurology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
10
School of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Bristol, Biomedical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(11), 2765; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112765
Received: 22 April 2019 / Revised: 1 June 2019 / Accepted: 3 June 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circadian Rhythms: Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms)
The kidney harbors one of the strongest circadian clocks in the body. Kidney failure has long been known to cause circadian sleep disturbances. Using an adenine-induced model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice, we probe the possibility that such sleep disturbances originate from aberrant circadian rhythms in kidney. Under the CKD condition, mice developed unstable behavioral circadian rhythms. When observed in isolation in vitro, the pacing of the master clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), remained uncompromised, while the kidney clock became a less robust circadian oscillator with a longer period. We find this analogous to the silencing of a strong slave clock in the brain, the choroid plexus, which alters the pacing of the SCN. We propose that the kidney also contributes to overall circadian timekeeping at the whole-body level, through bottom-up feedback in the hierarchical structure of the mammalian circadian clocks. View Full-Text
Keywords: circadian clocks; systemic clocks; CKD; kidney; SCN; hierarchical organization circadian clocks; systemic clocks; CKD; kidney; SCN; hierarchical organization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Myung, J.; Wu, M.-Y.; Lee, C.-Y.; Rahim, A.R.; Truong, V.H.; Wu, D.; Piggins, H.D.; Wu, M.-S. The Kidney Clock Contributes to Timekeeping by the Master Circadian Clock. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 2765.

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