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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061680

The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Diabetes and Its Vascular Complications

1
Immunobiology Research Group, The Heart Research Institute, 7 Eliza Street, Newtown, NSW 2042, Australia
2
Discipline of Medicine, The University of Sydney School of Medicine, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
3
Heart Health Theme, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
4
Adelaide Medical School, Faculty of Health & Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 31 May 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1833 KB, uploaded 5 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

Almost 600 million people are predicted to have diabetes mellitus (DM) by 2035. Diabetic patients suffer from increased rates of microvascular and macrovascular complications, associated with dyslipidaemia, impaired angiogenic responses to ischaemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, and inflammation. Despite recent treatment advances, many diabetic patients remain refractory to current approaches, highlighting the need for alternative agents. There is emerging evidence that high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are able to rescue diabetes-related vascular complications through diverse mechanisms. Such protective functions of HDL, however, can be rendered dysfunctional within the pathological milieu of DM, triggering the development of vascular complications. HDL-modifying therapies remain controversial as many have had limited benefits on cardiovascular risk, although more recent trials are showing promise. This review will discuss the latest data from epidemiological, clinical, and pre-clinical studies demonstrating various roles for HDL in diabetes and its vascular complications that have the potential to facilitate its successful translation. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes mellitus; microvascular; macrovascular; complications; dyslipidaemia; high-density lipoprotein; apolipoprotein A-I; dysfunctional; atherosclerosis diabetes mellitus; microvascular; macrovascular; complications; dyslipidaemia; high-density lipoprotein; apolipoprotein A-I; dysfunctional; atherosclerosis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Wong, N.K.P.; Nicholls, S.J.; Tan, J.T.M.; Bursill, C.A. The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Diabetes and Its Vascular Complications. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1680.

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