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Open AccessArticle

An Anion Conductance, the Essential Component of the Hydroxyl-Radical-Induced Ion Current in Plant Roots

1
Centro Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Colima; Av. 25 de julio 965, Villa de San Sebastian, Colima, Col. 28045, Mexico
2
School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia
3
Genómica Alimentaria, Universidad de La Ciénega del Estado de Michoacán de Ocampo, Av. Universidad 3000, Lomas de la Universidad, Sahuayo, Mich. 59103, Mexico
4
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(3), 897; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030897
Received: 17 February 2018 / Revised: 16 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 18 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma-Membrane Transport)
Oxidative stress signaling is essential for plant adaptation to hostile environments. Previous studies revealed the essentiality of hydroxyl radicals (HO•)-induced activation of massive K+ efflux and a smaller Ca2+ influx as an important component of plant adaptation to a broad range of abiotic stresses. Such activation would modify membrane potential making it more negative. Contrary to these expectations, here, we provide experimental evidence that HO• induces a strong depolarization, from −130 to −70 mV, which could only be explained by a substantial HO•-induced efflux of intracellular anions. Application of Gd3+ and NPPB, non-specific blockers of cation and anion conductance, respectively, reduced HO•-induced ion fluxes instantaneously, implying a direct block of the dual conductance. The selectivity of an early instantaneous HO•-induced whole cell current fluctuated from more anionic to more cationic and vice versa, developing a higher cation selectivity at later times. The parallel electroneutral efflux of K+ and anions should underlie a substantial leak of the cellular electrolyte, which may affect the cell’s turgor and metabolic status. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed in the context of cell fate determination, and ROS and cytosolic K+ signaling. View Full-Text
Keywords: anion conductance; electrolyte leakage; hydroxyl radical; membrane potential; MIFE; oxidative stress; patch-clamp anion conductance; electrolyte leakage; hydroxyl radical; membrane potential; MIFE; oxidative stress; patch-clamp
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pottosin, I.; Zepeda-Jazo, I.; Bose, J.; Shabala, S. An Anion Conductance, the Essential Component of the Hydroxyl-Radical-Induced Ion Current in Plant Roots. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 897.

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