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Open AccessArticle

Proteome Map of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Embryos Containing Different Amounts of Residual Chlorophylls

1
Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
2
Department of Biochemistry, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199178, Russia
3
Proteome Analytics, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Weinberg 3, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
4
Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034, Russia
5
Research Institute of Hygiene, Occupational Pathology, and Human Ecology, Federal Medicobiological Agency, 188663 Kapitolovo, Russia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally on the manuscript.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(12), 4066; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19124066
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 11 December 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 15 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Proteomic Research 2.0)
Due to low culturing costs and high seed protein contents, legumes represent the main global source of food protein. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is one of the major legume crops, impacting both animal feed and human nutrition. Therefore, the quality of pea seeds needs to be ensured in the context of sustainable crop production and nutritional efficiency. Apparently, changes in seed protein patterns might directly affect both of these aspects. Thus, here, we address the pea seed proteome in detail and provide, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive annotation of the functions and intracellular localization of pea seed proteins. To address possible intercultivar differences, we compared seed proteomes of yellow- and green-seeded pea cultivars in a comprehensive case study. The analysis revealed totally 1938 and 1989 nonredundant proteins, respectively. Only 35 and 44 proteins, respectively, could be additionally identified after protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP), potentially indicating the high efficiency of our experimental workflow. Totally 981 protein groups were assigned to 34 functional classes, which were to a large extent differentially represented in yellow and green seeds. Closer analysis of these differences by processing of the data in KEGG and String databases revealed their possible relation to a higher metabolic status and reduced longevity of green seeds. View Full-Text
Keywords: chlorophylls; LC-MS-based proteomics; pea (Pisum sativum L.); proteome functional annotation; proteome map; seeds; seed proteomics chlorophylls; LC-MS-based proteomics; pea (Pisum sativum L.); proteome functional annotation; proteome map; seeds; seed proteomics
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Mamontova, T.; Lukasheva, E.; Mavropolo-Stolyarenko, G.; Proksch, C.; Bilova, T.; Kim, A.; Babakov, V.; Grishina, T.; Hoehenwarter, W.; Medvedev, S.; Smolikova, G.; Frolov, A. Proteome Map of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Embryos Containing Different Amounts of Residual Chlorophylls. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 4066.

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