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Tocopherols and Tocotrienols in Common and Emerging Dietary Sources: Occurrence, Applications, and Health Benefits

1
Department of Biochemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1B 3X9, Canada
2
Department of Agri-Food Industry, Food & Nutrition, “Luiz de Queiroz” College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba 13418-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maurizio Battino
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(10), 1745; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17101745
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 5 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 20 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tocopherols and Tocotrienols: Metabolism and Properties)
Edible oils are the major natural dietary sources of tocopherols and tocotrienols, collectively known as tocols. Plant foods with low lipid content usually have negligible quantities of tocols. However, seeds and other plant food processing by-products may serve as alternative sources of edible oils with considerable contents of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Tocopherols are among the most important lipid-soluble antioxidants in food as well as in human and animal tissues. Tocopherols are found in lipid-rich regions of cells (e.g., mitochondrial membranes), fat depots, and lipoproteins such as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Their health benefits may also be explained by regulation of gene expression, signal transduction, and modulation of cell functions. Potential health benefits of tocols include prevention of certain types of cancer, heart disease, and other chronic ailments. Although deficiencies of tocopherol are uncommon, a continuous intake from common and novel dietary sources of tocopherols and tocotrienols is advantageous. Thus, this contribution will focus on the relevant literature on common and emerging edible oils as a source of tocols. Potential application and health effects as well as the impact of new cultivars as sources of edible oils and their processing discards are presented. Future trends and drawbacks are also briefly covered. View Full-Text
Keywords: tocols; edible oils; specialty oils; phenolic antioxidants; cardiovascular disease; cancer; diabetes; obesity tocols; edible oils; specialty oils; phenolic antioxidants; cardiovascular disease; cancer; diabetes; obesity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shahidi, F.; De Camargo, A.C. Tocopherols and Tocotrienols in Common and Emerging Dietary Sources: Occurrence, Applications, and Health Benefits. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1745.

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