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Open AccessArticle

Genetic Deletion of Rheb1 in the Brain Reduces Food Intake and Causes Hypoglycemia with Altered Peripheral Metabolism

1
Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy/West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
2
West China School of Preclinical and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
3
Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(1), 1499-1510; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms15011499
Received: 16 November 2013 / Revised: 12 December 2013 / Accepted: 7 January 2014 / Published: 21 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Excessive food/energy intake is linked to obesity and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a critical role in the control of food intake and peripheral metabolism. The signaling pathways in hypothalamic neurons that regulate food intake and peripheral metabolism need to be better understood for developing pharmacological interventions to manage eating behavior and obesity. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase, is a master regulator of cellular metabolism in different cell types. Pharmacological manipulations of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in hypothalamic neurons alter food intake and body weight. Our previous study identified Rheb1 (Ras homolog enriched in brain 1) as an essential activator of mTORC1 activity in the brain. Here we examine whether central Rheb1 regulates food intake and peripheral metabolism through mTORC1 signaling. We find that genetic deletion of Rheb1 in the brain causes a reduction in mTORC1 activity and impairs normal food intake. As a result, Rheb1 knockout mice exhibit hypoglycemia and increased lipid mobilization in adipose tissue and ketogenesis in the liver. Our work highlights the importance of central Rheb1 signaling in euglycemia and energy homeostasis in animals. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rheb1; genetic deletion; food intake; hypoglycemia; ketogenesis Rheb1; genetic deletion; food intake; hypoglycemia; ketogenesis
MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, W.; Jiang, W.; Luo, L.; Bu, J.; Pang, D.; Wei, J.; Du, C.; Xia, X.; Cui, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Q.; Chen, M. Genetic Deletion of Rheb1 in the Brain Reduces Food Intake and Causes Hypoglycemia with Altered Peripheral Metabolism. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15, 1499-1510.

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