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Agriculture and Bioactives: Achieving Both Crop Yield and Phytochemicals

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Biosystems Engineering Group, Biosystems Laboratory, Division of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Engineering, The Autonomous University of Queretaro, C.U Cerro de las Campanas, S/N, colonia Las Campanas, C.P. 76010, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico
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Division of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Chemistry, The Autonomous University of Queretaro, C.U Cerro de las Campanas, S/N, colonia Las Campanas, C.P. 76010, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico
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Division of Environmental Sciences and Technologies, School of Chemistry, The Autonomous University of Queretaro, C.U Cerro de las campanas, S/N, Col. Las Campanas, C.P. 76010, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14(2), 4203-4222; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms14024203
Received: 27 November 2012 / Revised: 8 January 2013 / Accepted: 29 January 2013 / Published: 20 February 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research in Plant Secondary Metabolism)
Plants are fundamental elements of the human diet, either as direct sources of nutrients or indirectly as feed for animals. During the past few years, the main goal of agriculture has been to increase yield in order to provide the food that is needed by a growing world population. As important as yield, but commonly forgotten in conventional agriculture, is to keep and, if it is possible, to increase the phytochemical content due to their health implications. Nowadays, it is necessary to go beyond this, reconciling yield and phytochemicals that, at first glance, might seem in conflict. This can be accomplished through reviewing food requirements, plant consumption with health implications, and farming methods. The aim of this work is to show how both yield and phytochemicals converge into a new vision of agricultural management in a framework of integrated agricultural practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: elicitor; organic agriculture; conventional agriculture; GMOs; secondary metabolite; plant stress elicitor; organic agriculture; conventional agriculture; GMOs; secondary metabolite; plant stress
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García-Mier, L.; Guevara-González, R.G.; Mondragón-Olguín, V.M.; Del Rocío Verduzco-Cuellar, B.; Torres-Pacheco, I. Agriculture and Bioactives: Achieving Both Crop Yield and Phytochemicals. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14, 4203-4222.

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