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Article

Increase in the Intracellular Bulk Water Content in the Early Phase of Cell Death of Keratinocytes, Corneoptosis, as Revealed by 65 GHz Near-Field CMOS Dielectric Sensor

1
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
2
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan
3
PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012, Japan
4
Institute for Advanced Medical Sciences, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya 663-8501, Japan
5
Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
6
School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, Tokyo 192-0982, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stefano Materazzi
Molecules 2022, 27(9), 2886; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27092886
Received: 25 February 2022 / Revised: 22 April 2022 / Accepted: 28 April 2022 / Published: 30 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquaphotomics - Exploring Water Molecular Systems in Nature)
While bulk water and hydration water coexist in cells to support the expression of biological macromolecules, how the dynamics of water molecules, which have long been only a minor role in molecular biology research, relate to changes in cellular states such as cell death has hardly been explored so far due to the lack of evaluation techniques. In this study, we developed a high-precision measurement system that can discriminate bulk water content changes of ±0.02% (0.2 mg/cm3) with single-cell-level spatial resolution based on a near-field CMOS dielectric sensor operating at 65 GHz. We applied this system to evaluate the temporal changes in the bulk water content during the cell death process of keratinocytes, called corneoptosis, using isolated SG1 (first layer of stratum granulosum) cells in vitro. A significant irreversible increase in the bulk water content was observed approximately 1 h before membrane disruption during corneoptosis, which starts with cytoplasmic high Ca2+ signal. These findings suggest that the calcium flux may have a role in triggering the increase in the bulk water content in SG1 cells. Thus, our near-field CMOS dielectric sensor provides a valuable tool to dissect the involvement of water molecules in the various events that occur in the cell. View Full-Text
Keywords: bulk water content; near-field CMOS dielectric sensor; fluorescence imaging; corneoptosis; SG1 cell bulk water content; near-field CMOS dielectric sensor; fluorescence imaging; corneoptosis; SG1 cell
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shiraga, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Kikuchi, S.; Amagai, M.; Matsui, T. Increase in the Intracellular Bulk Water Content in the Early Phase of Cell Death of Keratinocytes, Corneoptosis, as Revealed by 65 GHz Near-Field CMOS Dielectric Sensor. Molecules 2022, 27, 2886. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27092886

AMA Style

Shiraga K, Ogawa Y, Kikuchi S, Amagai M, Matsui T. Increase in the Intracellular Bulk Water Content in the Early Phase of Cell Death of Keratinocytes, Corneoptosis, as Revealed by 65 GHz Near-Field CMOS Dielectric Sensor. Molecules. 2022; 27(9):2886. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27092886

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shiraga, Keiichiro, Yuichi Ogawa, Shojiro Kikuchi, Masayuki Amagai, and Takeshi Matsui. 2022. "Increase in the Intracellular Bulk Water Content in the Early Phase of Cell Death of Keratinocytes, Corneoptosis, as Revealed by 65 GHz Near-Field CMOS Dielectric Sensor" Molecules 27, no. 9: 2886. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27092886

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