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Article

Thermochemical Liquefaction as a Cleaner and Efficient Route for Valuing Pinewood Residues from Forest Fires

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CERENA-Centre for Natural Resources and the Environment, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
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WOODCHEM SA, Estrada das Moitas Altas, 2401-902 Leiria, Portugal
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INIAV, Ministry of Agriculture, 2780-159 Oeiras, Portugal
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IDMEC—Instituto de Engenharia Mecânica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Rafał M. Łukasik
Molecules 2021, 26(23), 7156; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237156
Received: 10 November 2021 / Revised: 22 November 2021 / Accepted: 24 November 2021 / Published: 26 November 2021
Biomass thermochemical liquefaction is a chemical process with multifunctional bio-oil as its main product. Under this process, the complex structure of lignocellulosic components can be hydrolysed into smaller molecules at atmospheric pressure. This work demonstrates that the liquefaction of burned pinewood from forest fires delivers similar conversion rates into bio-oil as non-burned wood does. The bio-oils from four burned biomass fractions (heartwood, sapwood, branches, and bark) showed lower moisture content and higher HHV (ranging between 32.96 and 35.85 MJ/kg) than the initial biomasses. The increased HHV resulted from the loss of oxygen, whereas the carbon and hydrogen mass fractions increased. The highest conversion of bark and heartwood was achieved after 60 min of liquefaction. Sapwood, pinewood, and branches reached a slightly higher conversion, with yields about 8% greater, but with longer liquefaction time resulting in higher energy consumption. Additionally, the van Krevelen diagram indicated that the produced bio-oils were closer and chemically more compatible (in terms of hydrogen and oxygen content) to the hydrocarbon fuels than the initial biomass counterparts. In addition, bio-oil from burned pinewood was shown to be a viable alternative biofuel for heavy industrial applications. Overall, biomass from forest fires can be used for the liquefaction process without compromising its efficiency and performance. By doing so, it recovers part of the lost value caused by wildfires, mitigating their negative effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: pinewood; forest wildfire; liquefaction; bio-oil pinewood; forest wildfire; liquefaction; bio-oil
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goncalves, D.; Orišková, S.; Matos, S.; Machado, H.; Vieira, S.; Bastos, D.; Gaspar, D.; Paiva, R.; Bordado, J.C.; Rodrigues, A.; Galhano dos Santos, R. Thermochemical Liquefaction as a Cleaner and Efficient Route for Valuing Pinewood Residues from Forest Fires. Molecules 2021, 26, 7156. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237156

AMA Style

Goncalves D, Orišková S, Matos S, Machado H, Vieira S, Bastos D, Gaspar D, Paiva R, Bordado JC, Rodrigues A, Galhano dos Santos R. Thermochemical Liquefaction as a Cleaner and Efficient Route for Valuing Pinewood Residues from Forest Fires. Molecules. 2021; 26(23):7156. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237156

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goncalves, Diogo, Sofia Orišková, Sandro Matos, Henrique Machado, Salomé Vieira, David Bastos, Daniela Gaspar, Ricardo Paiva, João C. Bordado, Abel Rodrigues, and Rui Galhano dos Santos. 2021. "Thermochemical Liquefaction as a Cleaner and Efficient Route for Valuing Pinewood Residues from Forest Fires" Molecules 26, no. 23: 7156. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237156

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