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Review

From Waste to Green Applications: The Use of Recovered Gold and Palladium in Catalysis

1
Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Molecular Sciences Research Hub, White City Campus, London W12 0BZ, UK
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, INSTM Unit, University of Cagliari, Via Marengo 2, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Farid Chemat
Molecules 2021, 26(17), 5217; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175217
Received: 30 May 2021 / Revised: 19 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 28 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recovery and Optical Application of Noble Metals Compound)
The direct use in catalysis of precious metal recovery products from industrial and consumer waste is a very promising recent area of investigation. It represents a more sustainable, environmentally benign, and profitable way of managing the low abundance of precious metals, as well as encouraging new ways of exploiting their catalytic properties. This review demonstrates the feasibility and sustainability of this innovative approach, inspired by circular economy models, and aims to stimulate further research and industrial processes based on the valorisation of secondary resources of these raw materials. The overview of the use of recovered gold and palladium in catalytic processes will be complemented by critical appraisal of the recovery and reuse approaches that have been proposed. View Full-Text
Keywords: recycling; gold; palladium; catalysis; WEEE; TWC; critical metals; circular economy; green processes recycling; gold; palladium; catalysis; WEEE; TWC; critical metals; circular economy; green processes
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MDPI and ACS Style

McCarthy, S.; Lee Wei Jie, A.; Braddock, D.C.; Serpe, A.; Wilton-Ely, J.D.E.T. From Waste to Green Applications: The Use of Recovered Gold and Palladium in Catalysis. Molecules 2021, 26, 5217. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175217

AMA Style

McCarthy S, Lee Wei Jie A, Braddock DC, Serpe A, Wilton-Ely JDET. From Waste to Green Applications: The Use of Recovered Gold and Palladium in Catalysis. Molecules. 2021; 26(17):5217. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175217

Chicago/Turabian Style

McCarthy, Sean, Alvin Lee Wei Jie, D. Christopher Braddock, Angela Serpe, and James D. E. T. Wilton-Ely. 2021. "From Waste to Green Applications: The Use of Recovered Gold and Palladium in Catalysis" Molecules 26, no. 17: 5217. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175217

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