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Open AccessReview

Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for DNA Biosensors—How Far Are We?

1
Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 1 Pasteur St., 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
2
Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology of Polish Academy of Sciences, 3 Pasteur St., 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
3
Holy Cross Cancer Center, 3 Stefana Artwińskiego St., 25-734 Kielce, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kamilla Malek
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4423; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244423
Received: 7 November 2019 / Revised: 28 November 2019 / Accepted: 29 November 2019 / Published: 4 December 2019
A sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA fragments (usually containing a mutation) can influence clinical decisions. Standard methods routinely used for this type of detection are PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction, and its modifications), and, less commonly, NGS (Next Generation Sequencing). However, these methods are quite complicated, requiring time-consuming, multi-stage sample preparation, and specially trained staff. Usually, it takes weeks for patients to obtain their results. Therefore, different DNA sensors are being intensively developed by many groups. One technique often used to obtain an analytical signal from DNA sensors is Raman spectroscopy. Its modification, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), is especially useful for practical analytical applications due to its extra low limit of detection. SERS takes advantage of the strong increase in the efficiency of Raman signal generation caused by a local electric field enhancement near plasmonic (typically gold and silver) nanostructures. In this condensed review, we describe the most important types of SERS-based nanosensors for genetic studies and comment on their potential for becoming diagnostic tools. View Full-Text
Keywords: SERS; DNA; surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy; nanosensor; biosensor; DNA mutations; thiolated DNA; nanoparticles; Raman reporters; label-free SERS; DNA; surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy; nanosensor; biosensor; DNA mutations; thiolated DNA; nanoparticles; Raman reporters; label-free
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pyrak, E.; Krajczewski, J.; Kowalik, A.; Kudelski, A.; Jaworska, A. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for DNA Biosensors—How Far Are We? Molecules 2019, 24, 4423.

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