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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Identification of Passion Fruit Oil Adulteration by Chemometric Analysis of FTIR Spectra

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Technische Thermodynamik, Universität Bremen, Badgasteiner Str. 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, Universität Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, UK
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Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany
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Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia agraria-Centro di ricerca CREA-Alimenti e Nutrizione, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Roma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3219; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183219
Received: 4 August 2019 / Revised: 1 September 2019 / Accepted: 3 September 2019 / Published: 4 September 2019
Passion fruit oil is a high-value product with applications in the food and cosmetic sectors. It is frequently diluted with sunflower oil. Sunflower oil is also a potential adulterant as its addition does not notably alter the appearance of the passion fruit oil. In this paper, we show that this is also true for the FTIR spectrum. However, the chemometric analysis of the data changes this situation. Principal component analysis (PCA) enables not only the straightforward discrimination of pure passion fruit oil and adulterated samples but also the unambiguous classification of passion fruit oil products from five different manufacturers. Even small amounts—significantly below 1%—of the adulterant can be detected. Furthermore, partial least-squares regression (PLSR) facilitates the quantification of the amount of sunflower oil added to the passion fruit oil. The results demonstrate that the combination of FTIR spectroscopy and chemometric data analysis is a very powerful tool to analyze passion fruit oil. View Full-Text
Keywords: passion fruit oil; maracuja oil; infrared spectroscopy; chemometrics; principal component analysis passion fruit oil; maracuja oil; infrared spectroscopy; chemometrics; principal component analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kiefer, J.; Lampe, A.I.; Nicoli, S.F.; Lucarini, M.; Durazzo, A. Identification of Passion Fruit Oil Adulteration by Chemometric Analysis of FTIR Spectra. Molecules 2019, 24, 3219.

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