Next Article in Journal
Diffusion Barrier Performance of AlCrTaTiZr/AlCrTaTiZr-N High-Entropy Alloy Films for Cu/Si Connect System
Previous Article in Journal
Short-Time Estimation of Fractionation in Atrial Fibrillation with Coarse-Grained Correlation Dimension for Mapping the Atrial Substrate
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Musical Collaboration in Rhythmic Improvisation

1
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New York University Tandon School of Engineering, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, New York University Tandon School of Engineering, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Entropy 2020, 22(2), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22020233
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 6 February 2020 / Accepted: 17 February 2020 / Published: 19 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Information theory and Symbolic Analysis: Theory and Applications)
Despite our intimate relationship with music in every-day life, we know little about how people create music. A particularly elusive area of study entails the spontaneous collaborative musical creation in the absence of rehearsals or scripts. Toward this aim, we designed an experiment in which pairs of players collaboratively created music in rhythmic improvisation. Rhythmic patterns and collaborative processes were investigated through symbolic-recurrence quantification and information theory, applied to the time series of the sound created by the players. Working with real data on collaborative rhythmic improvisation, we identified features of improvised music and elucidated underlying processes of collaboration. Players preferred certain patterns over others, and their musical experience drove musical collaboration when rhythmic improvisation started. These results unfold prevailing rhythmic features in collaborative music creation while informing the complex dynamics of the underlying processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: collaboration; information theory; music; recurrence; symbolic dynamics collaboration; information theory; music; recurrence; symbolic dynamics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nakayama, S.; Soman, V.R.; Porfiri, M. Musical Collaboration in Rhythmic Improvisation. Entropy 2020, 22, 233.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop