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Article

The Gender Productivity Gap in Croatian Science: Women Are Catching up with Males and Becoming Even Better

1
Department of Finance, Zagreb School of Economics and Management, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Finance, Luxembourg School of Business, 2453 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
3
Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Entropy 2020, 22(11), 1217; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22111217
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 22 October 2020 / Accepted: 23 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complexity in Economic and Social Systems)
How much different genders contribute to citations and whether we see different gender patterns between STEM and non-STEM researchers are questions that have long been studied in academia. Here we analyze the research output in terms of citations collected from the Web of Science of males and females from the largest Croatian university, University of Zagreb. Applying the Mann–Whitney statistical test, for most faculties, we demonstrate no gender difference in research output except for seven faculties, where males are significantly better than females on six faculties. We find that female STEM full professors are significantly more cited than male colleagues, while male non-STEM assistant professors are significantly more cited than their female colleagues. There are ten faculties where females have the larger average citations than their male colleagues and eleven faculties where the most cited researcher is woman. For the most cited researchers, our Zipf plot analyses demonstrate that both genders follow power laws, where the exponent calculated for male researchers is moderately larger than the exponent for females. The exponent for STEM citations is slightly larger than the exponent obtained for non-STEM citations, implying that compared to non-STEM, STEM research output leads to fatter tails and so larger citations inequality than non-STEM. View Full-Text
Keywords: power law; Zipf law; gender productivity gap power law; Zipf law; gender productivity gap
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wild, D.; Jurcic, M.; Podobnik, B. The Gender Productivity Gap in Croatian Science: Women Are Catching up with Males and Becoming Even Better. Entropy 2020, 22, 1217. https://doi.org/10.3390/e22111217

AMA Style

Wild D, Jurcic M, Podobnik B. The Gender Productivity Gap in Croatian Science: Women Are Catching up with Males and Becoming Even Better. Entropy. 2020; 22(11):1217. https://doi.org/10.3390/e22111217

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wild, Dorian, Margareta Jurcic, and Boris Podobnik. 2020. "The Gender Productivity Gap in Croatian Science: Women Are Catching up with Males and Becoming Even Better" Entropy 22, no. 11: 1217. https://doi.org/10.3390/e22111217

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