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3D Multi-Material Printing of an Anthropomorphic, Personalized Replacement Hand for Use in Neuroprosthetics Using 3D Scanning and Computer-Aided Design: First Proof-of-Technical-Concept Study

Peter Osypka Institute of Medical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Medical Engineering and Computer Science, Offenburg University, Badstr. 24, D-77652 Offenburg, Germany
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Prosthesis 2020, 2(4), 362-370; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis2040034
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 1 December 2020 / Accepted: 17 December 2020 / Published: 18 December 2020
Background: This paper presents a novel approach for a hand prosthesis consisting of a flexible, anthropomorphic, 3D-printed replacement hand combined with a commercially available motorized orthosis that allows gripping. Methods: A 3D light scanner was used to produce a personalized replacement hand. The wrist of the replacement hand was printed of rigid material; the rest of the hand was printed of flexible material. A standard arm liner was used to enable the user’s arm stump to be connected to the replacement hand. With computer-aided design, two different concepts were developed for the scanned hand model: In the first concept, the replacement hand was attached to the arm liner with a screw. The second concept involved attaching with a commercially available fastening system; furthermore, a skeleton was designed that was located within the flexible part of the replacement hand. Results: 3D-multi-material printing of the two different hands was unproblematic and inexpensive. The printed hands had approximately the weight of the real hand. When testing the replacement hands with the orthosis it was possible to prove a convincing everyday functionality. For example, it was possible to grip and lift a 1-L water bottle. In addition, a pen could be held, making writing possible. Conclusions: This first proof-of-concept study encourages further testing with users. View Full-Text
Keywords: amputee; anthropomorphic hand replacement; 3D multi-material printing; 3D light scanning; computer-aided design; neuroprosthetics; personalization amputee; anthropomorphic hand replacement; 3D multi-material printing; 3D light scanning; computer-aided design; neuroprosthetics; personalization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baron, J.; Hazubski, S.; Otte, A. 3D Multi-Material Printing of an Anthropomorphic, Personalized Replacement Hand for Use in Neuroprosthetics Using 3D Scanning and Computer-Aided Design: First Proof-of-Technical-Concept Study. Prosthesis 2020, 2, 362-370. https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis2040034

AMA Style

Baron J, Hazubski S, Otte A. 3D Multi-Material Printing of an Anthropomorphic, Personalized Replacement Hand for Use in Neuroprosthetics Using 3D Scanning and Computer-Aided Design: First Proof-of-Technical-Concept Study. Prosthesis. 2020; 2(4):362-370. https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis2040034

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baron, Jana; Hazubski, Simon; Otte, Andreas. 2020. "3D Multi-Material Printing of an Anthropomorphic, Personalized Replacement Hand for Use in Neuroprosthetics Using 3D Scanning and Computer-Aided Design: First Proof-of-Technical-Concept Study" Prosthesis 2, no. 4: 362-370. https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis2040034

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