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Managing Soils for Recovering from the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Carbon Management and Sequestration Center, SENR, The Ohio State University, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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Departments of Natural Sciences and Agriculture and Technical Studies, Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND 58601, USA
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Forensic Soil Science, Environmental and Biochemical Sciences Department, The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK
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Sydney Institute of Agriculture & School of Life and Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales 2006, Australia
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Soil Biogeochemistry, Institute of Agronomy and Nutritional Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Von–Seckendorff–Platz 3, D–06120 Halle, Germany
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Department of Soil Science, FD Hole Soils Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
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Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita 9, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan
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Environmental Planning, Arcadis Consulting Ltd, Bristol BS2 0FR, UK
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Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 1018, Farmington, NM 87499, USA
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Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, 72070 Tübingen, Germany
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Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P. O. Box 5003, 1433 Ås, Norway
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Department for Soil Health and Plant Nutrition, Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Spargelfeldstrasse 191, A-1220 Vienna, Austria
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Interdepartmental Research Centre on the “Earth Critical Zone” for Supporting the Landscape and Agroenvironment Management (CRISP), University of Naples Federico II, 8055 Portici (NA), Italy
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Institute for Agricultural and Forestry Systems in the Mediterranean (ISAFOM), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Piazzale Enrico Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (NA), Italy
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Institute for Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Hermann Rodewaldstr. 2, 24118 Kiel, Germany
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Department of Global Liberal Arts, Aichi University, Nagoya 453-8777, Japan
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Agricultural Engineering Department, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Campus Cuautitlán Izcalli, México 54750, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soil Syst. 2020, 4(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030046
Received: 26 June 2020 / Revised: 16 July 2020 / Accepted: 20 July 2020 / Published: 28 July 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the global food supply chain and exacerbated the problem of food and nutritional insecurity. Here we outline soil strategies to strengthen local food production systems, enhance their resilience, and create a circular economy focused on soil restoration through carbon sequestration, on-farm cycling of nutrients, minimizing environmental pollution, and contamination of food. Smart web-based geospatial decision support systems (S-DSSs) for land use planning and management is a useful tool for sustainable development. Forensic soil science can also contribute to cold case investigations, both in providing intelligence and evidence in court and in ascertaining the provenance and safety of food products. Soil can be used for the safe disposal of medical waste, but increased understanding is needed on the transfer of virus through pedosphere processes. Strengthening communication between soil scientists and policy makers and improving distance learning techniques are critical for the post-COVID restoration. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic; circular economy; food security; soil management; urban agriculture; soil carbon sequestration; forensic soil science; geographical information systems; soil disposal of medical waste; connecting soil science with policy makers COVID-19 pandemic; circular economy; food security; soil management; urban agriculture; soil carbon sequestration; forensic soil science; geographical information systems; soil disposal of medical waste; connecting soil science with policy makers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lal, R.; Brevik, E.C.; Dawson, L.; Field, D.; Glaser, B.; Hartemink, A.E.; Hatano, R.; Lascelles, B.; Monger, C.; Scholten, T.; Singh, B.R.; Spiegel, H.; Terribile, F.; Basile, A.; Zhang, Y.; Horn, R.; Kosaki, T.; Sánchez, L.B.R. Managing Soils for Recovering from the COVID-19 Pandemic. Soil Syst. 2020, 4, 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030046

AMA Style

Lal R, Brevik EC, Dawson L, Field D, Glaser B, Hartemink AE, Hatano R, Lascelles B, Monger C, Scholten T, Singh BR, Spiegel H, Terribile F, Basile A, Zhang Y, Horn R, Kosaki T, Sánchez LBR. Managing Soils for Recovering from the COVID-19 Pandemic. Soil Systems. 2020; 4(3):46. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030046

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lal, Rattan, Eric C. Brevik, Lorna Dawson, Damien Field, Bruno Glaser, Alfred E. Hartemink, Ryusuke Hatano, Bruce Lascelles, Curtis Monger, Thomas Scholten, Bal R. Singh, Heide Spiegel, Fabio Terribile, Angelo Basile, Yakun Zhang, Rainer Horn, Takashi Kosaki, and Laura B.R. Sánchez. 2020. "Managing Soils for Recovering from the COVID-19 Pandemic" Soil Systems 4, no. 3: 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030046

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