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Integrating Soil Compaction Impacts of Tramlines Into Soil Erosion Modelling: A Field-Scale Approach

Department of Geography, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Ludewig-Meyn Straße 14, 24118 Kiel, Germany
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Soil Syst. 2019, 3(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems3030051
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 30 July 2019 / Accepted: 31 July 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Erosion and Land Degradation)
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Abstract

Soil erosion by water is one of the main soil degradation processes worldwide, which leads to declines in natural soil fertility and productivity especially on arable land. Despite advances in soil erosion modelling, the effects of compacted tramlines are usually not considered. However, tramlines noticeably contribute to the amount of soil eroded inside a field. To quantify these effects we incorporated high-resolution spatial tramline data into modelling. For simulation, the process-based soil erosion model EROSION3D has been applied on different fields for a single rainfall event. To find a reasonable balance between computing time and prediction quality, different grid cell sizes (5, 1, and 0.5 m) were used and modelling results were compared against measured soil loss. We found that (i) grid-based models like E3D are able to integrate tramlines, (ii) the share of measured erosion between tramline and cultivated areas fits well with measurements for resolution ≤1 m, (iii) tramline erosion showed a high dependency to the slope angle and (iv) soil loss and runoff are generated quicker within tramlines during the event. The results indicate that the integration of tramlines in soil erosion modelling improves the spatial prediction accuracy, and therefore, can be important for soil conservation planning.
Keywords: water erosion; wheel tracks; physical-based model; Weichselian till; erosion prediction; management effects; soil degradation; soil conservation; erosion and sediment control water erosion; wheel tracks; physical-based model; Weichselian till; erosion prediction; management effects; soil degradation; soil conservation; erosion and sediment control
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Saggau, P.; Kuhwald, M.; Duttmann, R. Integrating Soil Compaction Impacts of Tramlines Into Soil Erosion Modelling: A Field-Scale Approach. Soil Syst. 2019, 3, 51.

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