Next Article in Journal
Assessing Wildfire Exposure to Communities and Protected Areas in Portugal
Previous Article in Journal
Environmental Influences on Density and Height Growth of Natural Ponderosa Pine Regeneration following Wildfires
Article

Georeferencing Oblique Aerial Wildfire Photographs: An Untapped Source of Fire Behaviour Data

1
Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
2
Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada, Victoria, BC V8Z 1M5, Canada
3
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow, and Landscape Research WSL, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wade T. Tinkham
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 13 October 2021 / Accepted: 16 October 2021 / Published: 22 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Fire Science Models, Remote Sensing, and Data)
In this study, we investigate a novel application of the photogrammetric monoplotting technique for assessing wildfires. We demonstrate the use of the software program WSL Monoplotting Tool (MPT) to georeference operational oblique aerial wildfire photographs taken during airtanker response in the early stages of fire growth. We located the position of the fire front in georeferenced pairs of photos from five fires taken 31–118 min apart, and calculated the head fire spread distance and head fire rate of spread (HROS). Our example photos were taken 0.7 to 4.7 km from fire fronts, with camera angles of incidence from −19° to −50° to image centre. Using high quality images with detailed landscape features, it is possible to identify fire front positions with high precision; in our example data, the mean 3D error was 0.533 m and the maximum 3D error for individual fire runs was less than 3 m. This resulted in a maximum HROS error due to monoplotting of only ~0.5%. We then compared HROS estimates with predictions from the Canadian Fire Behavior Prediction System, with differences mainly attributed to model error or uncertainty in weather and fuel inputs. This method can be used to obtain observations to validate fire spread models or create new empirical relationships where databases of such wildfire photos exist. Our initial work suggests that monophotogrammetry can provide reproducible estimates of fire front position, spread distance and rate of spread with high accuracy, and could potentially be used to characterize other fire features such as flame and smoke plume dimensions and spotting. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildfire modelling; fire behaviour; rate of spread; remote sensing; monophotogrammetry; WSL monoplotting tool; georeferencing; oblique aerial wildfire photography wildfire modelling; fire behaviour; rate of spread; remote sensing; monophotogrammetry; WSL monoplotting tool; georeferencing; oblique aerial wildfire photography
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hart, H.; Perrakis, D.D.B.; Taylor, S.W.; Bone, C.; Bozzini, C. Georeferencing Oblique Aerial Wildfire Photographs: An Untapped Source of Fire Behaviour Data. Fire 2021, 4, 81. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040081

AMA Style

Hart H, Perrakis DDB, Taylor SW, Bone C, Bozzini C. Georeferencing Oblique Aerial Wildfire Photographs: An Untapped Source of Fire Behaviour Data. Fire. 2021; 4(4):81. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040081

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hart, Henry, Daniel D.B. Perrakis, Stephen W. Taylor, Christopher Bone, and Claudio Bozzini. 2021. "Georeferencing Oblique Aerial Wildfire Photographs: An Untapped Source of Fire Behaviour Data" Fire 4, no. 4: 81. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040081

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop