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Article

Study of Fuel-Smoke Dynamics in a Prescribed Fire of Boreal Black Spruce Forest through Field-Deployable Micro Sensor Systems

1
Airshed and Watershed Stewardship Branch, Alberta Environment and Parks, Government of Alberta, 9888 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, AB T5J 5C6, Canada
2
Policy Division, Alberta Environment and Parks, Government of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T5K 2J6, Canada
3
Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Wildfire Management Branch, Government of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T5K 1E4, Canada
4
Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB T6H 3S5, Canada
5
Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1H9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 May 2020 / Revised: 9 July 2020 / Accepted: 9 July 2020 / Published: 12 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Boreal Fire-Fuels Interactions)
Understanding the combustion dynamics of fuels, and the generation and propagation of smoke in a wildland fire, can inform short-range and long-range pollutant transport models, and help address and mitigate air quality concerns in communities. Smoldering smoke can cause health issues in nearby valley bottoms, and can create hazardous road conditions due to low-visibility. We studied near-field smoke dynamics in a prescribed fire of 3.4 hectares of land in a boreal black spruce forest in central Alberta. Smoke generated from the fire was monitored through a network of five field-deployable micro sensor systems. Sensors were placed within 500–1000 m of the fire area at various angles in downwind. Smoke generated from flaming and smoldering combustions showed distinct characteristics. The propagation rates of flaming and smoldering smoke, based on the fine particulate (PM2.5) component, were 0.8 and 0.2 m/s, respectively. The flaming smoke was characterized by sharp rise of PM2.5 in air with concentrations of up to 940 µg/m3, followed by an exponential decay with a half-life of ~10 min. Smoldering combustion related smoke contributed to PM2.5 concentrations above 1000 µg/m3 with slower decay half-life of ~18 min. PM2.5 emissions from the burn area during flaming and smoldering phases, integrated over the combustion duration of 2.5 h, were ~15 and ~16 kilograms, respectively, as estimated by our mass balance model. View Full-Text
Keywords: air quality; smoke dynamics; fine particulate matters; flaming combustion; smoldering combustion; micro sensor system; smoke propagation model; prescribed fire air quality; smoke dynamics; fine particulate matters; flaming combustion; smoldering combustion; micro sensor system; smoke propagation model; prescribed fire
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huda, Q.; Lyder, D.; Collins, M.; Schroeder, D.; Thompson, D.K.; Marshall, G.; Leon, A.J.; Hidalgo, K.; Hossain, M. Study of Fuel-Smoke Dynamics in a Prescribed Fire of Boreal Black Spruce Forest through Field-Deployable Micro Sensor Systems. Fire 2020, 3, 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire3030030

AMA Style

Huda Q, Lyder D, Collins M, Schroeder D, Thompson DK, Marshall G, Leon AJ, Hidalgo K, Hossain M. Study of Fuel-Smoke Dynamics in a Prescribed Fire of Boreal Black Spruce Forest through Field-Deployable Micro Sensor Systems. Fire. 2020; 3(3):30. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire3030030

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huda, Quamrul, David Lyder, Marty Collins, Dave Schroeder, Dan K. Thompson, Ginny Marshall, Alberto J. Leon, Ken Hidalgo, and Masum Hossain. 2020. "Study of Fuel-Smoke Dynamics in a Prescribed Fire of Boreal Black Spruce Forest through Field-Deployable Micro Sensor Systems" Fire 3, no. 3: 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire3030030

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