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Abstract

Modelling Yield and Seasonal Soil Salinity Dynamics in Rice-Grasspea Cropping System for the Coastal Saline Zone of West Bengal, India

1
Department of Agronomy, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur 741252, India
2
CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Brisbane 4067, Australia
3
Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Department of Agricultural Meteorology and Physics, Mohanpur 741252, India
4
CSIRO Land and Water, Canberra 2601, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at the third International Tropical Agriculture Conference (TROPAG 2019), Brisbane, Australia, 11–13 November 2019.
Proceedings 2019, 36(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2019036146
Published: 4 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Proceedings of The Third International Tropical Agriculture Conference (TROPAG 2019))
Due to seasonal dry-season salt accumulation in the coastal saline zone (CSZ) of West Bengal, India, the cultivation of winter crops (following summer rice) is rare. To address this issue, field experiments were conducted over two years (2016–18) in the CSZ to study the feasibility of cropping system intensification through incorporating grass pea into the dominant rice-fallow rotation. The experiment was conducted in strip plot design with two factors namely, Factor A: Six dates of rice sowing (at one-week intervals—2nd week of June to 3rd week of July) and Factor B: Two land situations (Medium-upland and Medium-lowland). The experiment was simulated using APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator) utilizing the APSIM-SWIM water balance module to understand the mechanisms of seasonal soil salinity dynamics and the associated crop responses. The results suggest that irrespective of land situation, early sown rice (2nd week of June) produces higher dry matter and yield compared to late sown crops. This early rice sowing also facilitated better subsequent grass pea performance, by avoiding the worst of the salinity build-up and drought stress later in the winter. The model performed well in simulating the observed rice and grass pea yields (R2 = 0.97 with low bias (slope, α = 0.93, intercept, β = 149 kg ha−1), RMSE = 558 kg ha−1). It may be concluded that ASPIM-SWIM is an effective tool to understand, assess and predict the complex bio-physical mechanisms of ground water and soil salinity dynamics in rice-pulse-based cropping systems of CSZ of West Bengal.
Keywords: APSIM; SWIM; salinity dynamics; coastal saline; pulses; cropping system APSIM; SWIM; salinity dynamics; coastal saline; pulses; cropping system
MDPI and ACS Style

Sarkar, S.; Gaydon, D.S.; Brahmachari, K.; Nanda, M.K.; Ghosh, A.; Mainuddin, M. Modelling Yield and Seasonal Soil Salinity Dynamics in Rice-Grasspea Cropping System for the Coastal Saline Zone of West Bengal, India. Proceedings 2019, 36, 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2019036146

AMA Style

Sarkar S, Gaydon DS, Brahmachari K, Nanda MK, Ghosh A, Mainuddin M. Modelling Yield and Seasonal Soil Salinity Dynamics in Rice-Grasspea Cropping System for the Coastal Saline Zone of West Bengal, India. Proceedings. 2019; 36(1):146. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2019036146

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sarkar, Sukamal, Donald S Gaydon, Koushik Brahmachari, Manoj Kumar Nanda, Argha Ghosh, and Mohammed Mainuddin. 2019. "Modelling Yield and Seasonal Soil Salinity Dynamics in Rice-Grasspea Cropping System for the Coastal Saline Zone of West Bengal, India" Proceedings 36, no. 1: 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2019036146

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