Next Article in Journal
A Cybersecurity Experience with Cloud Virtual-Remote Laboratories
Previous Article in Journal
Using IoT for Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in Education
Open AccessProceedings

Assisted Behavior Control with Wearable Devices: A Case Study for High-Functioning Autism

Department of Computer Engineering, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at the 13th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing and Ambient Intelligence UCAmI 2019, Toledo, Spain, 2–5 December 2019.
Proceedings 2019, 31(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2019031002
Published: 15 November 2019
This study aims to analyze the efficacy of wearable and mobile systems to assist people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) in their emotional self-regulation learning process compared to the proven efficacy of this technology with individuals with autism in the low functioning area of the spectrum. For that purpose, we carry out an experiment with a smartwatch system (Taimun-Watch) that had been tested previously with individuals in the low-functioning range. This experiment involves two (N = 2) individuals with HFA and we compare their performance to the obtained in the prior experiment by monitoring their activity and observing their behavior during 7 and 9 labor days, respectively. The results evidence that, although it takes more time to find and customize effective self-regulation strategies in comparison to the low-functioning autism individuals due to their sharper, more complex cognitive abilities and perception, they were able to use the system to recover from stress episodes as well using the system and tolerated suitably the devices in their daily activity.
Keywords: special education; smartwatches; autism; emotional self-regulation; assistive technologies special education; smartwatches; autism; emotional self-regulation; assistive technologies
MDPI and ACS Style

Torrado, J.C.; Gomez, J.; Montoro, G. Assisted Behavior Control with Wearable Devices: A Case Study for High-Functioning Autism. Proceedings 2019, 31, 2.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop