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Extended Abstract

Consequence Modelling for Estimating the Toxic Material Dispersion Using ALOHA: Case Studies at Two Different Chemical Plants †

Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, Gambang, Kuantan 26300, Pahang, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at Environment, Green Technology and Engineering International Conference (EGTEIC 2018), Caceres, Spain, 18–20 June 2018.
Proceedings 2018, 2(20), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2201268
Published: 18 October 2018
Industrial disaster does not only result in enormous calamities and huge property damages but also deteriorate the environment especially when it involved hazardous materials. The occurrence of major accident at major hazard installation (MHI) is unpredictable. Therefore, both structural and non-structural measures should come in the forefront before it claims human life and tremendously destroy the assets and environment. Thus, the main objectives of this study is to simulate the consequence modelling due to toxic materials dispersion (sulfuric acid) and subsequently suggest the evacuation mapping. The Areal Location Hazardous Atmosphere (ALOHA Version 5.4.7) was used to determine the threat zone and estimates the radius of toxic material dispersion from the source point. Two petrochemical plants were selected in this study and both are located at different petrochemical industrial estates in East Coast Region of Peninsular Malaysia. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the radius of toxic material affects the adjacent facilities and other chemical plants in proximity. The threat zones with the radius of 0.72 miles (red), 2.6 miles (orange) and 6.0 miles (yellow) respectively were determined for the first case study. As for the latter, the threat zones are greater than 6 miles for all zones. Based on both estimations, the evacuation mappings were proposed by sketching the map from Google satellite in the MARPLOT application.
Keywords: ALOHA; evacuation mapping; MARPLOT; threat zone ALOHA; evacuation mapping; MARPLOT; threat zone
MDPI and ACS Style

Ramli, A.; Ghani, N.A.; Hamid, N.A.; Desa, M.S.Z.M. Consequence Modelling for Estimating the Toxic Material Dispersion Using ALOHA: Case Studies at Two Different Chemical Plants. Proceedings 2018, 2, 1268. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2201268

AMA Style

Ramli A, Ghani NA, Hamid NA, Desa MSZM. Consequence Modelling for Estimating the Toxic Material Dispersion Using ALOHA: Case Studies at Two Different Chemical Plants. Proceedings. 2018; 2(20):1268. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2201268

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ramli, Azizan, Norfaridah Abdul Ghani, Norhaniza Abdul Hamid, and Mohd Shaiful Zaidi Mat Desa. 2018. "Consequence Modelling for Estimating the Toxic Material Dispersion Using ALOHA: Case Studies at Two Different Chemical Plants" Proceedings 2, no. 20: 1268. https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2201268

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