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Article

Comparison of Immunochromatographic Test (ICT) and Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) for Detecting Lymphatic Filariasis Antigen in American Samoa, 2016

1
National Centre for Epidemiology and Health, Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University, Acton 2601, Australia
2
Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia
3
Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University, Acton 2601, Australia
4
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, Westmead 2145, Australia
5
American Samoa Department of Health, Pago Pago, AS 96799, USA
6
College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns 4870, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Edwin Michael and James W. Kazura
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6030132
Received: 28 April 2021 / Revised: 9 July 2021 / Accepted: 11 July 2021 / Published: 14 July 2021
Circulating filarial antigen (Ag) prevalence, measured using rapid point-of-care tests, is the standard indicator used for monitoring and surveillance in the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis. In 2015, the immunochromatographic test (ICT) was replaced with the filariasis test strip (FTS), which has higher reported sensitivity. Despite differences in sensitivity, no changes in recommended surveillance targets were made when the FTS was introduced. In 2016, we conducted lymphatic filariasis surveys in American Samoa using FTS, which found higher Ag prevalence than previous surveys that used ICT. To determine whether the increase was real, we assessed the concordance between FTS and ICT results by paired testing of heparinised blood from 179 individuals (63% FTS-positive). ICT had 93.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity for identifying FTS-positive persons, and sensitivity was not associated with age, gender, or presence of microfilariae. Based on these findings, if ICT had been used in the 2016 surveys, the results and interpretation would have been similar to those reported using FTS. American Samoa would have failed Transmission Assessment Survey (TAS) of Grade 1 and 2 children with either test, and community prevalence would not have been significantly different (4.1%, 95% CI, 3.3–4.9% with FTS vs. predicted 3.8%, 95%, CI: 3.1–4.6% with ICT). View Full-Text
Keywords: lymphatic filariasis; American Samoa; diagnostics; antigen lymphatic filariasis; American Samoa; diagnostics; antigen
MDPI and ACS Style

Sheel, M.; Lau, C.L.; Sheridan, S.; Fuimaono, S.; Graves, P.M. Comparison of Immunochromatographic Test (ICT) and Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) for Detecting Lymphatic Filariasis Antigen in American Samoa, 2016. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 132. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6030132

AMA Style

Sheel M, Lau CL, Sheridan S, Fuimaono S, Graves PM. Comparison of Immunochromatographic Test (ICT) and Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) for Detecting Lymphatic Filariasis Antigen in American Samoa, 2016. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2021; 6(3):132. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6030132

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sheel, Meru, Colleen L. Lau, Sarah Sheridan, Saipale Fuimaono, and Patricia M. Graves 2021. "Comparison of Immunochromatographic Test (ICT) and Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) for Detecting Lymphatic Filariasis Antigen in American Samoa, 2016" Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 6, no. 3: 132. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6030132

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