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Article

Elucidating the Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Acquisition by Triatomine Insects: Evidence from a Large Field Survey of Triatoma infestans

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2
Zoonotic Disease Research Lab, One Health Unit, School of Public Health and Administration, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Lima Province 15102, Peru
3
Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5(2), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5020087
Received: 25 March 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 26 May 2020 / Published: 1 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chagas Disease)
Blood-sucking triatomine bugs transmit the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. We measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in 58,519 Triatoma infestans captured in residences in and near Arequipa, Peru. Among bugs from infected colonies, T. cruzi prevalence increased with stage from 12% in second instars to 36% in adults. Regression models demonstrated that the probability of parasite acquisition was roughly the same for each developmental stage. Prevalence increased by 5.9% with each additional stage. We postulate that the probability of acquiring the parasite may be related to the number of feeding events. Transmission of the parasite does not appear to be correlated with the amount of blood ingested during feeding. Similarly, other hypothesized transmission routes such as coprophagy fail to explain the observed pattern of prevalence. Our results could have implications for the feasibility of late-acting control strategies that preferentially kill older insects. View Full-Text
Keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi; Triatoma infestans; Chagas disease; parasite prevalence; coprophagy Trypanosoma cruzi; Triatoma infestans; Chagas disease; parasite prevalence; coprophagy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tustin, A.W.; Castillo-Neyra, R.; Tamayo, L.D.; Salazar, R.; Borini-Mayorí, K.; Levy, M.Z. Elucidating the Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Acquisition by Triatomine Insects: Evidence from a Large Field Survey of Triatoma infestans. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5, 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5020087

AMA Style

Tustin AW, Castillo-Neyra R, Tamayo LD, Salazar R, Borini-Mayorí K, Levy MZ. Elucidating the Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Acquisition by Triatomine Insects: Evidence from a Large Field Survey of Triatoma infestans. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2020; 5(2):87. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5020087

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tustin, Aaron W., Ricardo Castillo-Neyra, Laura D. Tamayo, Renzo Salazar, Katty Borini-Mayorí, and Michael Z. Levy 2020. "Elucidating the Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Acquisition by Triatomine Insects: Evidence from a Large Field Survey of Triatoma infestans" Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 5, no. 2: 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5020087

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